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Author Topic: Learning BAT....jets  (Read 456 times)

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tomoose

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Learning BAT....jets
« on: May 18, 2021, 06:26:46 AM »

I've been mainly a WW2 'flyer' but am getting familiar with the more modern jets in BAT.  That being said, I'm seeking some advice from the more experience pilots, specifically carrier landings with jets such as the Prowler or Tomcat.

I have created a simple carrier landing mission in FMB using the Persian Gulf map with the jet approx 40km off and on a straight run-in to land on the carrier.

Whereas I am a dab hand at landing an F4U on a WW2 carrier, I fairly suck so far at trying to put a jet on a modern angle-deck carrier.
A couple of questions...
- What is an acceptable landing speed?  I'm guessing that my approach is much too fast.
- Ref the green light on the carrier:  does that assist in any way?  (BTW, on a slightly separate note; the carrier does not become visible until I am relatively close and seems to pop into view)
- Ref the 'V' and 'O' indicators to the side of the cockpit, I assume that is glide-path related and that keeping the 'O' steady indicates the path is good. I'm failing miserably on that score LOL.

Any advice/guidance is appreciated.
regards,
Tomoose
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Koty

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Re: Learning BAT....jets
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2021, 07:55:43 AM »

Hi...

landing jets is ... specific to each jet. And issues landing can in no small part can be caused by outright wrong FM.

the V and O indicate your "speed" (not actual speed)

V = you are fast, you need to slow down (nose up!)
O = on speed
A = you are slow, you need to gain speed (nose down!)

then you need to keep looking at where your flight vector goes (on older jets you just have to guess)
if it looks you'll be short, throttle up (do not change your pitch to fix this), if it looks you're going long, throttle down

before you get it into muscle memory, you'll have many aborted landings

oh, and that green light, if it works, should be your glide path indicator

although the basics are the same as props, the nuances will differ aircraft to aircraft
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tomoose

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Re: Learning BAT....jets
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2021, 08:49:42 AM »

Thanks Koty.  As with everything....practice, practice, practice.  So far I think I'm overcompensating for possible stall and keeping too high and fast.  I figured it out with the F4U after lots of attempts so obviously I need a lot more practice with the modern jets.

Thanks for the info on the V, O, A indicators.
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Griffon_301

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Re: Learning BAT....jets
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2021, 09:22:56 AM »

Best advice...learn the stall characteristics of your aircraft...
Take it for a spin, climb to a good altitude and then see how and when it stalls... Do this in clean and dirty configurations...
That way, you learn how your aircraft will react in the pattern and younger the idea how it will react to steering inputs and power changes...
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