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Author Topic: Curtiss SBC-4  (Read 3165 times)

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Mission_bug

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Re: Curtiss SBC-4
« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2021, 11:18:17 AM »

Superb, looking great Mike. 8)

Take care and be safe.

Wishing you all the very best, Pete. ;D
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Griffon_301

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Re: Curtiss SBC-4
« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2021, 11:30:29 AM »

The French bought a bunch of the Helldivers too but these were held up in the States and then "stored" on the Carrier Bearn which itself got stranded in the Carribean and could not cross the Atlantic anymore to deliver its load when France fell to the Germans...
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Bwf.

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Re: Curtiss SBC-4
« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2021, 11:42:55 AM »

It's great to see this type being brought to the game ]thumleft[
Here's the operational history of the USN/USMC SBC's :
Code: [Select]
Curtiss SBC Helldiver Series
Operational history:

U.S. Navy
=========
In August 1936, the Navy signed a contract for 83 SBC-3s (Curtiss Model 77A). Delivery of the SBC-3s to the fleet began on 17 July 1937 when the first aircraft were issued to Scouting Squadron Five (VS-5) serving in USS Yorktown (CV-5) however, Yorktown was not commissioned until 30 September 1937 and the ship then began sea trials. On 10 December 1937, VS-5 went aboard Yorktown and served aboard her until replaced by Douglas SBD-3s Dauntlesses in 1940.

By June 1938, three of the five scouting squadrons serving in aircraft carriers were equipped with SBC-3s while the other two were equipped with Vought SBU-1s. The three ships with SBC-3s were:

USS Enterprise (CV-6): Fighting Squadron Six (VF-6) had an SBC-3 and VS-6 had 20 Helldivers.

USS Saratoga (CV-3): Bombing Squadron Three (VB-3) had one SBC-3, VF-3 had an SBC-3 and VS-3 had 21 Helldivers.

USS Yorktown (CV-5): VS-5 had ten SBC-3s.

One of the SBC-3s was kept at the factory and redesignated XSBC-4 (Curtiss Model 77B). This aircraft was re-engined with the 750 hp (559 kW) Wright R-1820-22 nine cylinder, single row, air-cooled engine

The initial contract for 58 SBC-4s was signed on 5 January 1938. This was followed by two additional contracts, one for 31 Helldivers on 27 July 1938 and the third contract for 35 aircraft on 13 August 1938. Total aircraft contracted for was 124. The aircraft were powered by the 850 hp (634 kW) Wright R-1820-24 engine.

The first squadron to receive the SBC-4s was VS-2 in USS Lexington (CV-2) replacing the Vought SBU-1s. By 26 June 1939, VS-2 was fully equipped with 21 aircraft. This was the only aircraft carrier that flew the SBC-4 and they were replaced by Douglas SBD-2 and -3 Dauntlesses in 1941.

Because of the expanding aviation training program, the majority of SBC-4s, and other training aircraft, were assigned to Naval Reserve Air Bases (NRABs) to allow reserve Navy and Marine airmen assigned to reserve scouting squadrons (VS and VMS) and maintain their proficiency. By June 1940, 11 NRABs had SBC-4s as follows:

NRAB Anacostia, District of Columbia: 3 SBC-4s assigned to VS-6R and VMS-3R
NRAB Boston, Massachusetts: 3 SBC-4s assigned to VS-1R, VS-2R and VMS-1R
NRAB Detroit, Michigan: 3 SBC-4s assigned to VS-8R and VMS-5R
NRAB Glenview, Illinois: .4 SBC-4s assigned to VS-9R
NRAB Kansas City, Kansas: 4 SBC-4s assigned to VS-12R and VMS-10R
NRAB Long Beach, California: 4 SBC-4s assigned to VS-13R, VS-14R and VMS-7R
NRAB Minneapolis, Minnesota: 3 SBC-4s assigned to VS-10R and VMS-6R
NRAB New York, New York: 4 SBC-4s assigned to VS-3R, VS-4R and VMS-2R
NRAB Oakland, California: 4 SBC-4s assigned to VS-15R and VMS-8R
NRAB Seattle, Washington: 4 SBC-4s assigned to VS-16R and VMS-9R
NRAB St. Louis, Missouri: 3 SBC-4s assigned to VS-11R

As time advanced, the Navy acquired newer, more modern aircraft and the SBC-3s were replaced by the Douglas SBD Dauntless. By 7 December 1941, the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps had 69 SBC-3s and 118 SBC-4s in the inventory based at NASs, NRABs and the Naval Aircraft Factory (NAF) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The largest number were at NAS Miami, Florida where they were used for intermediate and dive bombing training.

In December 1941, the SBCs were based at:

NAF, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: 1 XSBC-1 and 1 SBC-3
NAS Corpus Christi, Texas: 34 SBC-4s
NAS Miami, Florida: 55 SBC-3s
NAS Norfolk, Virginia: 4 SBC-3s and 10 SBC-4s
NAS San Diego, California: 9 SBC-3s and 11 SBC-4s
Naval Mission, Lima, Peru: 1 SBC-4

USS Hornet (CV-8)
Bombing Squadron Eight (VB-8): 19 SBC-4s,
Scouting Squadron Eight (VS-8): 20 SBC-4s

Hornet was undergoing sea trials in the Atlantic on 7 December and the two squadrons kept their SBC-4s until the ship sailed to San Diego, California in March 1942. At that time, the two squadrons had transitioned to the SBD-3 Dauntless and she became the last ship to operate the SBC aboard aircraft carriers.

An additional 50 SBC-4s, originally ordered by the French, were built between February and May 1941 to replace those sent overseas. The major change was replacing the 135-U.S.-gallon (511-liter) fuselage fuel tank with a 126-U.S. gallon (477-liter) self-sealing fuel tank. The last SBC-4 was delivered in May 1941.

By 1944, the SBC-3s were no longer needed and they were stricken from the inventory. The longest to survive were 12 aircraft at NAS Jacksonville, Florida which were stricken on 31 October 1944.


U.S. Marine Corps
=================
Marine Observation Squadron 151 flew the SBC-4 at Samoa until June 1943.
The U.S. Marines received one SBC-3 in 1938 and which was assigned to Marine Fighter Squadron Two (VMF-2, redesignated VMF-211 on 1 July 1941) at NAS San Diego, California. It was sent to the Battle Fleet Pool in June 1939.

In January 1940, the Marine Corps had four SBC-4s.Two were based at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS), Quantico, Virginia; one was assigned to VMF-1 (redesignated VMF-111 on 1 July 1941) and the second, the XSBC-4, was assigned to Marine Utility Squadron One (VMJ-1 redesignated VMJ-152 on 7 July 1941). The other two aircraft were based at NAS, San Diego, California; one SBC-4 was assigned to VMF-2 and the second to VMJ-2 (redesignated VMJ-252 on 1 July 1941).

On 7 December 1941, the Marine Corps had 23 SBC-4s in their inventory. Twelve of them were assigned to a Marine observation squadron (VMO):

MCAS Quantico, Virginia: 1 XSBC-4 and 5 SBC-4s,
NAS San Diego, California: 5 SBC-4s, and
VMO-151, MCAS Quantico, Virginia: 12 SBC-4s

VMO-151 transferred to Tafuna (now Pago Pago International Airport), Tutuila Island, American Samoa, on 9 May 1942 with their SBC-4s. The squadron was redesignated Marine Scout Bombing Squadron One Hundred Fifty One (VMSB-151) on 15 September 1942. A second observation squadron, VMO-155, was commissioned in American Samoa on 1 October 1942 by taking half of VMSB-151's personnel and equipment. VMO-155 received ten SBC-4s and a Grumman J2F-5 Goose however, six officers and 15 enlisted men of the squadron returned to the U.S. on 8 December 1942 as a nucleus to form a new VMO-155 and the remaining personnel were transferred to Guadalcanal Island in the Solomon Islands.

In December 1942, the VMSB-151 SBC-4s were being replaced by Douglas SBD Dauntlesses and by June 1943, the squadron had been fully equipped with SBD-4s and they moved to Uvea Island in the Wallis Group leaving their SBC-4s behind.

The last SBC reported in Marine squadron service was an SBC-4 at American Samoa in service with VMSB-151 on 1 June 1943.
]cheers[
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Zflyer48

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Re: Curtiss SBC-4
« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2021, 08:14:22 AM »

Imported front landing gear from Hawk III.
Proceeding slowly.



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Type83Fighter

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Re: Curtiss SBC-4
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2021, 01:40:34 AM »

Oh, how did I miss this beauty? Looks amazing, one day I hope to make a "what-if" if Japan and the US clashed in 1937.
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duffys tavern

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Re: Curtiss SBC-4
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2021, 08:20:28 AM »

Coming along nicely, keep up the good work. Really appreciate what you are doing.
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Dreamk

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Re: Curtiss SBC-4
« Reply #18 on: May 04, 2021, 12:56:04 AM »

Hi Zflyer! what happened with this plane? still on the works?
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Zflyer48

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Re: Curtiss SBC-4
« Reply #19 on: May 04, 2021, 08:05:24 AM »

It went down with the ship. But, new construction is underway.
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Type83Fighter

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Re: Curtiss SBC-4
« Reply #20 on: May 06, 2021, 06:08:57 AM »

Sorry to hear about your computer :( glad this project is still alive.
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