Special Aircraft Service

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Aermacchi Mb-326 by GIO - V1.0 20180120  (Read 6661 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

4S_Vega

  • Modder
  • member
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3748
Aermacchi Mb-326 by GIO - V1.0 20180120
« on: January 20, 2018, 12:50:26 PM »

Aermacchi MB-326 by GIO

Ultimate version of this trainer/light attack plane

For Stand Alone or BAT installation

WIP Topic
https://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,54320.0.html

air.ini
Quote
MB-326 air.MB_326 1 NOINFO i01 SUMMER
MB-326E air.MB_326E 1 NOINFO i01 SUMMER
MB-326H air.MB_326H 1 NOINFO i01 SUMMER
MB-326GC air.MB_326GC 1 NOINFO i01 SUMMER
MB-326M air.MB_326M 1 NOINFO i01 SUMMER
MB-326K air.MB_326K 1 NOINFO i01 SUMMER

plane
Quote
MB-326 Aermacchi MB-326, 1957
MB-326E Aermacchi MB-326E, 1962
MB-326H Hawker CA-30, 1967
MB-326GC  Embraer AT-26 Xavante, 1971
MB-326M Atlas Impala Mk.I, 1971
MB-326K Atlas Impala Mk.II, 1974




Quote
The Aermacchi MB-326 was a low-wing monoplane with an all-metal structure composed of light alloys. It was one of the first jet trainers to be developed with the aim of catering to both for ab initio and advanced instruction. As originally developed, the MB-326 functioned as a refined but simple aircraft capable of covering the considerably wide range of performance characteristics required to cover both ab initio training and advanced instruction alike; other major characteristics of the type included the capacity to deliver a high rate of utilization in conjunction with minimised servicing and maintenance requirements. According to Flight International, the type was suitable for the teaching of the majority of advanced flying techniques. In addition to being relatively easy to fly, a high degree of safety was also intentionally built into it, including adoption of new Martin-Baker-built ejection seats.

The MB-326 was powered by a single Rolls-Royce Viper non-afterburning turbojet engine, initial production aircraft were powered by the Viper 11 model, capable of generating up to 2,5001b thrust. The engine possessed multiple favourable attributes, including its general simplicity and robustness, relatively low revolutions per minute (RPM) and turbine entry temperature (TET), rapid acceleration, ease of installation, and its somewhat forgiving nature to mishandling in the air by students. Air was provided to the engine via a pair of low-profile intakes set into the wing roots. The Viper was produced under licence by Italian aviation company Piaggio following an agreement established with British company Bristol Siddeley two years ago.

In a structural perspective, the MB-326 was relatively straightforward. Both the fuselage and the wing were constructed in three sections; of these, the centre section of the wing was integral to the fuselage. The fuselage was divided into a forward, central, and rear section; the forward section contained the nose wheel and radio systems; the centre part, accommodated the cockpit, fuel tanks and the engine; and the rear section which comprised both the tail unit and jet pipe. The fuel system had one large tank in the middle-fuselage and two in the wingtips; a single-point pressure-fuelling system is located on the starboard side of the aircraft to provide a total refuelling time of around five minutes.The rear of each wing had flaps, and ailerons with a trim surface; each wing had 22 ribs and two spars. Wing fences were added mid-wing to increase the lift characteristics. Accordingly, the MB-326 was readily capable of performing relatively slow speed take-off and landing while retaining an excellent rate of climb.

The MB-326 was outfitted with a tandem cockpit configuration, this arrangement had been chosen to result in a slimmer and more aerodynamically efficient fuselage in comparison to the more usual side-by-side arrangement. It was covered by a bubble canopy for excellent external visibility; it featured a windscreen anti-icing system powered by the engine compressor using bleed air. The cockpit was also pressurised, enabling the MB-326 to conduct high altitude flight. The ability to fly at higher altitudes was favourable for multiple purposes, including during the execution of aerobatic and navigational training, as well as improving fuel efficiency for long distance flights. The onboard systems were typically pre-manufactured units which were easy both to access and to remove; several elements were also intentionally interchangeable. The exterior of the aircraft was covered by a total of 80 inspection panels and doors; in-situ engine inspection could be performed via a pair of large access panels set above and below the engine bay while another pair of doors allow access to the intake duct's interior for the inspection of the first-stage compressor rotor blades.

ITALY
The MB-326 was one of the last Italian aircraft to hold the distinction of breaking multiple world records. Perhaps the most notable of these occurred during August 1961, when pilot Guido Carestiano set the C1D group 1 category altitude record of 15,489 meters. The record-breaking flights also provided publicity for the MB-326. In particular, one pilot, Massimo Ralli, was responsible for the establishment of several different records while flying the type:
8 February 1966, climbing records: 2 min 2 sec to 3,000 m, 3 min 56 sec to 6,000 m, 6 min 39 sec to 9,000 m, and 12,000 m in 10 min 53 sec.
18 March 1966, 15,690 m altitude record in horizontal flight, and 17,315 m with a launched climb.
18 July 1966, endurance record, with 970 km
2 August 1966, speed record over a 3 km straight: 871 km/h
December 1966: speed of 880.586 km/h over 15–25 km, 831.007 km/h over 100 km, 777.667 km/h over 500 km, and another endurance record at 777.557 km

These high-profile successes functioned as objective statements of the capable performance of the MB-326 and established the type as being one of the best aircraft amongst its contemporaries in its category. Another pilot Riccardo Peracchi, who was employed by for AMI, frequently demonstrated the manoeuvrability and controllability of the aircraft at airshows for a number of years. While Peracchi displayed the MB-326's agility, Ralli concentrated on exploring its cutting-edge performance; meanwhile, early customers of the aircraft were typically reporting their satisfaction with the type to Macchi.

The first production MB-326s, following a relatively protracted development cycle, were first delivered to the Lecce-Galatina school of the AMI's 214° Group, these were temporarily fielded at Brindisi, Apulia.[3] On 22 March 1962, the MB-326 formally entered squadron service with 43° Flyer course. The type was soon used to replace the aging North American T-6 Texan; typically, within the space of 130 hours, pilots would be as prepared to graduate as they would have been after receiving 210 hours training in the older T-6.

As a training solution, the MB-326 was considerably costlier but was met with enthusiasm amongst students; additionally, when used in combination with the Fiat G.91Y advanced trainer, it enabled the enactment of an "entirely-jet" training course for AMI pilots, and moreover these were domestically designed and produced aircraft. According to aerospace publication Flight International, during the early 1960s, the AMI's flight training programme was heavily influenced by the impending entry into service of the Lockheed F-104G Starfighter.

As well as being amongst the first customers to procure the aircraft, the AMI would be amongst the final customers of the later-built models of the MB-326 as well. The service ordered a batch of 12 MB-326E, comprising six MB-326 updated to MB-326G, and six newly produced (MM.54384/389). They had provisions for armament, but the engine was the Viper 11 Mk 200 and not the Viper 20 Mk 540. In Italian service, the MB-326 was replaced by the MB-339 between 1981 and 1984, acting after that as fast linkage aircraft, replacing the old T-33s that were slightly faster. Unusually, the MB-326 did not see service with the Frecce Tricolori aerobatic team, who kept their faster G-91R PANs (they were later replaced by MB-339s).

In addition to its AMI service, the MB-326 was also employed in a civilian capacity within Italy. National flag carrier Alitalia placed an order for four trainer-configured aircraft, designated as the "D" version; these were expressly demilitarized and equipped with specialised instrumentation in order to train the airliner's pilots in preparation for the arrival of the new generation of jetliners that were being procured by the airliner.

Neither the "A" and "C" models of the MB-326 would ever be realized. The "A" variant had been intended to be operated as a light attack aircraft, armed with a pair of 7.62 mm machine guns which were to be installed upon the aircraft's nose. While none were originally built, a number of MB-326s were later referred to by the "A" designation, however, this was meant to indicated that these had been provisioned with a Marconi-built AD-370 automatic direction finder (ADF). The "C" version was envisioned as being provisioned with a nose-mounted North American Search And Ranging Radar (NASARR) unit and other electronic equipment in order to be used for the training of AMI F-104 pilots, however, this variant only appeared as a mock-up.




Australia
The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) used the MB-326H as a jet trainer. A total of 97 were ordered: 12 were delivered by Macchi, 18 assembled from kits in Australia, and another 67 were built by the Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation and Hawker Aircraft with the designation CA-30.[12] They were essentially similar to the MB-326G but with improved avionics. The RAAF's aerobatic team, The Roulettes, flew the MB-326H from December 1970 until 1989. RAAF pilot training in 1985 consisted of 60 hours pre-selection on CAC Winjeels, 150 hours medium and another 75 hours advanced training on MB-326s, before finally progressing to the Mirage IIIOD.
Although widely liked for its excellent handling and well-suited to its task, the service career of the MB-326 was cut short because of structural fatigue problems. The Australian fleet, for example, had a life of type extension program in the 1980s and were then re-winged in the early 1990s after a fatigue-related crash. Even so, the MB-326 was supplemented by new Pilatus PC-9 trainers to reduce flying hours, and the last examples had been withdrawn by 2001 when they were replaced by the Hawk 127.


Brazil

Brazil was the main customer for the MB-326, in 1970 ordering two prototypes and 166 MB-326GCs, called the AT-26 Xavante. It was produced under license by Embraer with a further six for Togo and 10 for Paraguay.
The aircraft was important also for two developments: from the MB.326K the MB.326L was produced, this was the direct ancestor of the Aermacchi MB.339. With license-building in Brazil, the MB.326 opened the field to further collaborations, leading to the AMX. Neither the MB.339 nor the AMX were as successful as the MB.326, but this machine was capable of further steps in technology and commerce.


South Africa

South Africa obtained a license to produce the MB-326M (similar to the 'G' model), as the Impala Mk I in 1964 with production starting in 1966. It received 40 Italian-built aircraft followed by about 125 built locally by the Atlas Aircraft Corporation, using them both as trainers and in an armed configuration. Seven examples of the MB-326K were also bought as light attack aircraft, with a further 15 assembled from kits, while around 78 were license-produced and known as the Impala Mk II.[4] Licence production of the single seat version began in 1974. The Impala Mk II, locally manufactured and equipped with French armament, was also advanced with a South African ECM suite.
The South African Defence Force employed Impalas during campaigns against the People's Armed Forces for the Liberation of Angola (FAPLA) and Cuban expeditionary troops in Angola between 1975 and 1989. Impala pilots typically flew at 550–650 km/h at a height of 15 m to avoid Angolan air defences. Over the course of the South African Border War, one was downed by an SA-7; another returned with an unexploded missile in its exhaust.
The aircraft had many advantages over expensive supersonic jets. Although slower, it could operate from relatively primitive airfields and strike swiftly. The South African Air Force (SAAF) used up to 6 x 120 kg or 4 x 250 kg bombs. The main armament consisted of 68 mm SNEB rocket-launchers (four x 6 or two x 18), and two 30 mm autocannon (with 300 rounds). These cannons were the real bonus for the Impala Mk II, helping to give a superior performance compared to earlier two-seat versions. The latter could also carry a pair of 30 mm DEFA guns in under-wing pods. However, dual capability as trainer-attackers was better appreciated, as was the availability of six hard points and so dual-seat versions were far more common. Six squadrons were equipped with the Impala Mk II in the SAAF during the 1970s and 1980s. Prior to Operation Moduler, most Impalas were withdrawn from their operating bases in South-West Africa, leaving the work to Mirage IIIs and Blackburn Buccaneers.
The flying school for Impalas was Flying Training School at Langebaanweg while operational squadrons were 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 Squadrons, with 85 Combat Flying School also having a small number of Impalas to supplement their Mirage trainers.

Impala Mk IIs were also opportunistically used as interceptors. In several encounters in 1985 with Mi-8 and Mi-24 helicopters, they shot down a total of six. This happened during a crucial phase of the ground war, when Angolan and Cuban troops were checked in an offensive against UNITA bases. This ended in disaster for the Angolan/Cuban alliance when their supplies were cut off by UNITA and the SAAF and front line troops ran out of ammunition. Helicopters were being used to supply the besieged troops and the SAAF cut off this link. Two Mi-24s were shot down in the first encounter while escorting Mi-17s. The MiG-21s that escorted them flew too high to react in time. Two days later the Impala Mk IIs struck again, downing two Mi-24s and two Mi-17s. Attacks on unsuspecting helicopters were carried out with only two guns per aircraft. The single seat Impala Mk IIs were also sometimes armed with Matra R550 Magic air-to-air missiles for self-defence. The Impala Mk II operated at extreme ranges and had to fly very low, climbing only when helicopters were seen at medium altitude. After each attack they returned to low level to avoid interception by enemy MiGs.



credits
Quote
gio963tto:all 3d works
Dreamk: weapons
western: weapons
Vega: FM and Java


WARNING!! TO RUN THIS MOD YOU NEED:


JET ERA
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,15649.0.html

COMMON UTILS
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php?topic=40490.0

WEAPONS PACK VER. 1.3
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,48603.0.html

SAS Engine MOD 2.7.1 western Full-pack
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,52489.0.html

WESTERN WEAPONS PACK GENERATION 2016
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,53426.0.html

L-39 PACK
https://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,47946.0.html


Download link
http://www.mediafire.com/file/95e87udx4i4kzan/MB-326_V1.0_20180120.rar

Link for fast installation into BAT
http s://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php?topic=57018.msg630590#msg630590

Pack is in BAT


Logged

DU30

  • member
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 262
Re: Aermacchi Mb-326 by GIO - V1.0 20180120
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2018, 07:07:10 PM »

Thank you, its working very well
Logged

MADMICK71

  • member
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 306
Re: Aermacchi Mb-326 by GIO - V1.0 20180120
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2018, 02:35:47 AM »

Thank you,

Massive improvement on the original WIP version.  Working in 4.12 JTW-MOD ACT 5.3. MB326K 50cal machine gun pods point inwards however work fine(Fire forwards like the other versions) small 3do issue. RAAF MB326H were also able to carry two SUU-11 Minigum pods however I like the 30mm gunpods for fun and blowing things up!. Flew a mission against a OV10 bronco as used by the Indonesian Air Force in the early 80's fun dog fight, Bronco lost.

Regards

Mick.
Logged

zsoltquack

  • member
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 155
Re: Aermacchi Mb-326 by GIO - V1.0 20180120
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2019, 03:31:47 AM »

load 30% CTD!

Code: [Select]
[2019.01.26. 10:29:53] ------------ BEGIN log session -------------
[10:29:53]  OpenGL provider: Opengl32.dll
[10:29:53]  OpenGL library:
[10:29:53]    Vendor: ATI Technologies Inc.
[10:29:53]    Render: Radeon RX 570 Series
[10:29:53]    Version: 4.6.13543 Compatibility Profile Context 25.20.15002.58
[10:29:53]    Extensions: GL_AMDX_debug_output GL_AMD_blend_minmax_factor GL_AMD_conservative_depth GL_AMD_debug_output [10:29:59] Error on MirageIIIC Loadout: GAttack: 2x130kgM4+2xShafrir+2x1300LtDroptank
[10:29:59] java.lang.ClassNotFoundException: com.maddox.il2.objects.weapons.Fuze_AN_M101A2
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.rts.ObjIO.classForName(ObjIO.java:138)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.objects.air.Aircraft$_WeaponSlot.<init>(Aircraft.java:271)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.objects.air.MIRAGEIIICJ.<clinit>(MIRAGEIIICJ.java:621)
[10:29:59] at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
[10:29:59] at java.lang.Class.forName(Unknown Source)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.rts.Spawn.get(Spawn.java:39)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.rts.Spawn.get(Spawn.java:28)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main.preloadAirClasses(Main.java:214)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main3D.beginApp(Main3D.java:1540)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main3D.beginApp(Main3D.java:1475)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.game.MainWin3D.beginApp(MainWin3D.java:212)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main.exec(Main.java:405)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.game.GameWin3D.main(GameWin3D.java:235)
[10:29:59] Error on Dagger Loadout: GAttack: 4x130kgM4+2xShafrir+2x1300LtDroptank
[10:29:59] java.lang.ClassNotFoundException
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.rts.ObjIO.classForName(ObjIO.java:138)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.objects.air.Aircraft$_WeaponSlot.<init>(Aircraft.java:271)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.objects.air.IAI_Kfir_C2.<clinit>(IAI_Kfir_C2.java:192)
[10:29:59] at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
[10:29:59] at java.lang.Class.forName(Unknown Source)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.rts.Spawn.get(Spawn.java:39)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.rts.Spawn.get(Spawn.java:28)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main.preloadAirClasses(Main.java:214)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main3D.beginApp(Main3D.java:1540)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main3D.beginApp(Main3D.java:1475)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.game.MainWin3D.beginApp(MainWin3D.java:212)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main.exec(Main.java:405)
[10:29:59] at com.maddox.il2.game.GameWin3D.main(GameWin3D.java:235)
[10:30:03] Spawn.get( com.maddox.il2.objects.air.MB_326 ): com.maddox.il2.objects.air.CockpitT_33i
[10:30:03] java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: com.maddox.il2.objects.air.CockpitT_33i
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.il2.objects.air.MB_326.class$(MB_326.java:61)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.il2.objects.air.MB_326.<clinit>(MB_326.java:68)
[10:30:03] at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
[10:30:03] at java.lang.Class.forName(Unknown Source)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.rts.Spawn.get(Spawn.java:39)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.rts.Spawn.get(Spawn.java:28)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main.preloadAirClasses(Main.java:214)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main3D.beginApp(Main3D.java:1540)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main3D.beginApp(Main3D.java:1475)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.il2.game.MainWin3D.beginApp(MainWin3D.java:212)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main.exec(Main.java:405)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.il2.game.GameWin3D.main(GameWin3D.java:235)
[10:30:03] java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError
[10:30:03] at java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
[10:30:03] at java.lang.Class.forName(Unknown Source)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main.preloadAirClasses(Main.java:216)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main3D.beginApp(Main3D.java:1540)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main3D.beginApp(Main3D.java:1475)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.il2.game.MainWin3D.beginApp(MainWin3D.java:212)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.il2.game.Main.exec(Main.java:405)
[10:30:03] at com.maddox.il2.game.GameWin3D.main(GameWin3D.java:235)
Logged

PhantomII

  • member
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 368
Re: Aermacchi Mb-326 by GIO - V1.0 20180120
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2019, 11:01:52 AM »

Hi zsoltquack, this aircraft needs the F-80 pack from here: https://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,48764.msg533588.html#msg533588 for the cockpit
and the L-39 pack from here: https://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,47946.msg529231.html#msg529231 for the engine sounds.

Hope this helps :)
Logged

zsoltquack

  • member
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 155
Re: Aermacchi Mb-326 by GIO - V1.0 20180120
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2019, 12:04:16 AM »

Hi Phantom,

I am grateful for your help!

The basic readme It was not indicated that this package should be installed  o_O

Zsolt
Logged

ROMULO

  • member
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 136
Re: Aermacchi Mb-326 by GIO - V1.0 20180120
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2019, 02:19:42 AM »

Thank you very much for this bird. The download link gives me an error, any help? Thank you.

Well yes, Mediafire is dead, any chance of recovering
Logged

EliseTheWulf

  • The Woman of the Skies
  • member
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 21
Re: Aermacchi Mb-326 by GIO - V1.0 20180120
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2019, 07:10:36 AM »

the Download Link seems to be Broken please fix~
Logged
Fly low! Fly fast! Make sure you're Never last!

bomberkiller

  • Treffen sich zwei Jäger...!
  • Modder
  • member
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4253
  • Bf-109G-6/R6 = Bomber Killer
Logged
FAC N° 9 ...cheers mein Schatz

EliseTheWulf

  • The Woman of the Skies
  • member
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 21
Re: Aermacchi Mb-326 by GIO - V1.0 20180120
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2019, 03:44:30 AM »

Thank you very Much~
 :D
Logged
Fly low! Fly fast! Make sure you're Never last!

ROMULO

  • member
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 136
Re: Aermacchi Mb-326 by GIO - V1.0 20180120
« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2019, 01:09:31 PM »

Thank you very Much  ;)
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.127 seconds with 25 queries.