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Author Topic: Mirage pack V1.3 - 20180925  (Read 22981 times)

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4S_Vega

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Mirage pack V1.3 - 20180925
« on: September 30, 2017, 04:20:38 AM »

Mirage V1.3 20180925 - 3d by Tango, Ranwers and Edlor

V1.3 LOG
Quote
- bug fixing in cruisse speed code, now works propely
- modified drag for dropranks


V1.2 log
Quote
- fixed AI bounce
- modified Takeoff behaviour
- modified cruise speed & fuel consumption


air.ini
Quote
MIRAGE-IIIC      air.MIRAGEIIIC 1             NOINFO  usa01 DESERT
MIRAGE-IIICJ      air.MIRAGEIIICJ 1             NOINFO  usa01 DESERT
IAI-Nesher        air.IAI_Nesher     NOINFO  usa01 SUMMER
IAI-Dagger        air.IAI_Dagger     NOINFO  usa01 SUMMER
IAI-Kfir-C2       air.IAI_Kfir_C2     NOINFO  usa01 SUMMER


plane
Quote
MIRAGE-IIIC       Mirage-IIIC, 1961
MIRAGE-IIICJ       Mirage-IIICJ, 1962
IAI-Nesher       IAI Nesher, 1971
IAI-Dagger       IAI Dagger, 1978
IAI-Kfir-C2       IAI Kfir-C2, 1976



Quote
On 25 June 1955, the first prototype of the Mystère-Delta, without afterburning engines or rocket motor and with an unusually large vertical stabilizer, conducted its maiden flight. In this configuration, it was able to attain a maximum speed of Mach 1.15. Following initial flights, it received a redesign that involved the vertical stabilizer being reduced in size along with the installation of afterburners and a rocket motor; it was at this point that the aircraft was renamed as the Mirage I. During late 1955, the prototype attained a recorded speed of Mach 1.3 in level flight without rocket assistance, as well as reaching Mach 1.6 when using the rocket motor. According to aviation author John F. Brindley, testing of the Mirage I and prototypes of the rival Trident and Durandal designs had demonstrated the limitations of the light fighter concept, namely limitations on both endurance and equipment/payload capacity. The small size of the Mirage I restricted its armament to a single air-to-air missile, and it was decided during flight trials that the aircraft was too small for the carriage of a useful armament. Following the completion of flying trials, the Mirage I prototype was eventually scrapped.

Dassault was keen to produce a successor to the Mirage I prototype; at one point, the firm was considering the production of an enlarged version, known as the Mirage II, which would have been furnished with a pair of Turbomeca Gabizo turbojet engine. However, the Mirage II ultimately remained unbuilt as it was bypassed for an even more ambitious design, being 30 per cent heavier than the original Mirage I, powered by the newly developed Snecma Atar afterburning turbojet engine, capable of generating up to 43.2 kN (9,700 lbf) of thrust. The Atar was an axial-flow turbojet design, having been derived from the German Second World War-era BMW 003 engine. The new Atar-equipped fighter design received the name Mirage III. There was also an even larger heavy fighter design drafted, referred to as the Mirage IV. A decisive factor had been interest from the French military, who had made its favour for the Mirage III proposal known to the company.

The Mirage III incorporated various new design principles, such as the transonic area rule concept, where changes to an aircraft's cross-section were made as gradual as possible, resulting in the famous "wasp waist" configuration of many supersonic fighters. Similar to its Mirage I predecessor, the Mirage III had provision for a booster rocket engine. On 17 November 1956, the prototype Mirage III perform its first flight. During its 10th flight, it was recorded as having attained a speed of Mach 1.52 at one point. During the course of the flight test programme, the prototype was fitted with a pair of manually-operated intake half-cone shock diffusers, known as souris ("mice"), which could be repositioning more forwards as the airspeed was increased to achieve a reduction in inlet pressure losses. Reportedly, their addition enabled an increased speed of Mach 1.65 to be reached, while use of the supplemental SEPR 66 rocket (as fitted to the Mirage I) had allowed for a speed of Mach 1.8 to be reached during September 1957.

The success of the Mirage III prototype resulted in an order for 10 pre-production Mirage IIIA fighters. Although the type had initially conceived of as an interceptor, the batch had been ordered with the intention of using them to develop the type for additional roles as well. The Mirage IIIA were almost 2 meters longer than the Mirage III prototype, had an enlarged wing of 17.3 per cent greater area, a chord reduced to 4.5 per cent, and an Atar 09B turbojet capable of generating afterburning thrust of up to 58.9 kN (13,200 lbf). The SEPR 841 rocket engine was also retained. The Mirage IIIA was also fitted with a Thomson-CSF-built Cyrano Ibis air intercept radar, operational-standard avionics, and a drag chute to shorten its landing roll.

During May 1958, the first Mirage IIIA conducted its first flight.  During October of that year, this aircraft achieved a top speed of Mach 2.2 during one of its test flights, thus becoming the first European aircraft to exceed Mach 2 in level flight. During December 1959, the tenth and final Mirage IIIA was rolled out; the last six pre-production aircraft were largely representative of the subsequent initial production standard. The test regime involved a wide variety of tasks, including the evaluation of the newer SEPR 841 rocket motor, various underwing drop tanks, and other major systems. One Mirage IIIA was powered by a Rolls-Royce Avon 67 engine capable of generating 71.1 kN (16,000 lbf) of thrust, to serve as a test model for Australian evaluation, which was given the Mirage IIIO designation. This variant flew in February 1961, but the Avon powerplant was ultimately not adopted upon production aircraft.

The first major production model, the Mirage IIIC, first flew in October 1960. The IIIC was largely similar to the earlier IIIA, being less than a half meter longer and featuring a full operational fit. The Mirage IIIC was a single-seat interceptor, with an Atar 09B turbojet engine, featuring an eyelid type variable exhaust. The Mirage IIIC was armed with twin 30 mm DEFA cannon fitted in the belly with the gun ports under the air intakes. Early Mirage IIIC production had three stores pylons, one under the fuselage and one under each wing; another outboard pylon was soon added to each wing, for a total of five, excluding a sleek supersonic tank which also had bomb-carrying capacity. The outboard pylon was intended to carry an AIM-9B Sidewinder air-to-air missile, later replaced by the Matra R550 Magic and also was armed with the radar guided Matra R530 Missile on the center line pylon.
Although provision for the rocket engine was retained, by this point in time, the era of the high-altitude bomber seemed to already be over; as such, the SEPR rocket engine was rarely or never fitted in practice. In the first place, it required removal of both the cannon armament and one of the internal fuel tanks, and in the second, apparently it had a reputation for setting the aircraft on fire. The space for the rocket engine was used for additional fuel, and the rocket nozzle was replaced by a ventral fin at first, and an airfield arresting assembly later.
A total of 95 Mirage IIICs were obtained by the French Air Force (Armée de l'Air, AdA), with initial operational deliveries in July 1961. The Mirage IIIC remained in service with the AdA until 1988.

Mirage IIIC
Single-seat all-weather interceptor-fighter aircraft, with longer fuselage than the IIIA (14.73 m (48.3 ft)) and equipped with a Cyrano Ibis radar. The Mirage IIIC was armed with two 30 mm (1.181 in) cannon, with a single Matra R.511, Nord AA.20 or Matra R530 air-to-air missile under the fuselage and two AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles under the wings. It was powered by an Atar 9B-3 turbojet engine, which could be supplemented by fitting an auxiliary rocket motor in the rear fuselage if the cannon were removed. 95 were built for the French Air Force.


Mirage IIICJ
Mirage IIIC for the Israeli Air Force, fitted with simpler electronics and with provision for the booster rocket removed 72 delivered between 1961 and 1964.


Israel had to replace more than 60 aircraft lost during the Six Day War and the War of Attrition which followed. Before the war, Israel began co-development with Dassault to build the Mirage 5 and it was eventually built by Israel and named Raam in Hebrew (thunder).

Dassault Aviation had developed the Mirage 5 at the request of the Israelis, who were the main foreign customers of the Mirage III. The Israeli Air Force (IAF) wanted the next version to have less all-weather capability in exchange for improved ordnance carrying capacity and range as the weather in the Middle East is mostly clear.

In January 1969, the French government arms embargo on Israel (in response to the 1968 Israeli raid on Lebanon) prevented the first 30 Mirage 5 aircraft (which were already paid for by Israel) plus optional 20 from being delivered and cut off support for the existing Mirage IIICJ fleet.

This was a setback for the Israeli Air Force, who needed the new Mirage to compensate for the losses of the Six Day War and was still using the Mirage IIIC. Israel then decided to produce the (Raam A and B project) airframes as it had the necessary plans, although Israel did not officially obtain a manufacturing license.

Officially, Israel built the aircraft after obtaining a complete set of drawings. However, some sources claim Israel received 50 Mirage 5s in crates from the French Air Force (AdA), while the AdA took over the 50 aircraft originally intended for Israel.

IAI Nesher
Production began in 1969 with the first empty airframes with no weapons, electronics, seat, or engine included, delivered directly from Dassault Aviation. The first Raam A was delivered in May, 1971. In November, 1971 the plane was renamed Nesher.

The Neshers' airframe was identical to the Mirage 5, but there was an extensive refitting of Israeli avionics, a Martin-Baker zero-zero ejection seat, and improved provisions for a wider range of AAMs (Air-to-Air Missiles), including the Israeli Shafrir heat-seeking missile. Fifty-one Nesher fighters (Nesher S) and ten Nesher two-seat trainers (Nesher T) were built in all.

The Nesher had simpler avionics than the Mirage IIIC and was slightly less maneuverable. However, it had longer range and bigger payload. The reduced maneuverability did not prevent the Nesher from performing well in air combat during the Yom Kippur war.

51 Nesher fighters and 10 Nesher two-seat trainers were built for the IAF. The first Nesher prototype flew in September 1969, with production deliveries to the IAF beginning in May 1971, ending in February 1974. These aircraft performed well during the 1973 Yom Kippur War, claiming over a hundred kills.


IAI Dagger
The remaining Israeli aircraft were refurbished and exported to the Argentine Air Force in two batches, 26 in 1978 and 13 in 1980, under the name Dagger, comprising 35 Dagger A single-seat fighters and four Dagger B two-seat trainers.
They formed a new unit, 6th Air Group, and were immediately enlisted with the help of the 8th Air Group (Mirage IIIEA) and the Peruvian Air Force, already a user of the Mirage 5, due to the escalating crisis with Chile that year.
During the 1982 Falklands War, they were deployed to the southern naval airbase of Río Grande, Tierra del Fuego, and an airfield in Puerto San Julián and despite the distance to their targets and lack of aerial refueling capability, managed to make 153 sorties against both ground and naval targets on the 45 days of operations. In the last role, they damaged HMS Antrim, Brilliant, Broadsword, Ardent, Arrow and Plymouth. Eleven Daggers were lost in combat (nine by AIM-9L Sidewinders fired from Sea Harriers and two by surface to air missiles).


IAI Kfir
The Kfir programme originated in the quest to develop a more capable version of the IAI Nesher, which was already in series production. After General De Gaulle embargoed the sale of arms to Israel, the IAF feared that it might lose qualitative superiority over its adversaries in the future, which were receiving increasingly advanced Soviet aircraft. The main and most advanced type of aircraft available to the IAF was the Mirage, but a severe problem developed due to the Mirage fleet's depletion due to attrition after the Six-Day War. Domestic production would avoid the problem of the embargo completely; efforts to reverse engineer and reproduce components of the Mirage were aided by Israeli espionage efforts to obtain technical assistance and blueprints from third party Mirage operators.
Two powerplants were initially selected for trials, the General Electric J79 turbojet and the Rolls-Royce Spey turbofan. In the end, the J79 was selected, not least because it was the same engine used on the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II, which the Israelis began to acquire from the United States in 1969, along with a license to produce the J79 themselves. The J79 was clearly superior to the original French Atar 09, providing a dry thrust of 49 kN (11,000 lbf) and an afterburning thrust of 83.4 kN (18,750 lbf).
In order to accommodate the new powerplant on the Mirage III's airframe, and to deliver the added cooling required by the J79, the aircraft's rear fuselage was slightly shortened and widened, its air intakes were enlarged, and a large air inlet was installed at the base of the vertical stabilizer, so as to supply the extra cooling needed for the afterburner. The engine itself was encased in a titanium heatshield.
The Kfir entered service with the IAF in 1975, the first units being assigned to the 101st "First Fighter" Squadron. Over the following years, several other squadrons were also equipped with the new aircraft. The role of the Kfir as the IAF's primary air superiority asset was short-lived, as the first F-15 Eagle fighters from the United States were delivered to Israel in 1976.
The Kfir's first recorded combat action took place on November 9, 1977, during an Israeli air strike on a training camp at Tel Azia, in Lebanon. The only air victory claimed by a Kfir during its service with the IAF occurred on June 27, 1979 when a Kfir C.2 shot down a Syrian MiG-21.
By the time of the Israeli invasion of southern Lebanon in 1982 (Operation Peace for Galilee) the IAF was able to use both its F-15s and F-16s for air superiority roles, leaving the Kfirs to carry out unescorted strike missions.




WARNING!! TO RUN THIS MOD YOU NEED:


JET ERA
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,15649.0.html

COMMON UTILS
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php?topic=40490.0

WEAPONS PACK VER. 1.3
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,48603.0.html

WESTERN WEAPONS PACK GENERATION 2016
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,53426.0.html

SAS Engine MOD western Full-pack
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,52489.0.html

Air Ground Ordnance pack by Dreamk
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,55355.0.html

important
Mirage III use this mod https://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,56464.msg625120.html#msg625120

If you don't use this mod delete Gloss1D0o.mat and rename -Gloss1D0o.mat at Gloss1D0o.mat.
and use skins with rivets from http://www.mediafire.com/file/2ff9ri1q9gj1df8/MIRAGE-IIIC-skins.rar


credits
Quote
Tango: Original 3d of IAI-Dagger
Ranwers: Original 3d of Mirage III, Cockpit and conversion of Dagger into IAI Kfir C2
Edlor: 3d modifications in IAI Nesher/Dagger
mm: Skins
Max: Skins
Dreamk: Weapons
Western: Weapons
Benitomuso: FM debug tools
Vega: fm and Java


Download link
http://www.mediafire.com/file/xa6wi7sgh5f5yg6/Mirage_V1.3_20180925.rar/file

Skins by Fly!
http://www.mediafire.com/file/i9b4adqoc2bkkdd/MIRAGEIIIC.7z


EDIT by Ranwers:
Mirage III use this mod https://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,56464.msg625120.html#msg625120

If you don't use this mod delete Gloss1D0o.mat and rename -Gloss1D0o.mat at Gloss1D0o.mat.
and use skins with rivets from http://www.mediafire.com/file/2ff9ri1q9gj1df8/MIRAGE-IIIC-skins.rar
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4S_Vega

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Re: Mirage pack V1.0 - 20170930
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2017, 04:20:54 AM »

reserved
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taskf53

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Re: Mirage pack V1.0 - 20170930
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2017, 04:45:18 AM »

 :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :D :D :D :D :D :D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D :P
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SAS~Epervier

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Re: Mirage pack V1.0 - 20170930
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2017, 05:12:40 AM »

Congratulations to everyone who participated in this project!
I've seen a lot of Mirage fly!  ;)
The Mirage III is (and will remain) for me the most beautiful fighter plane in the world.
His cousin the Mirage IV is (and will remain) for me the most beautiful bombing plane in the world.
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A bove ante, ab asino retro, a stulto undique caveto.

cgagan

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Re: Mirage pack V1.0 - 20170930
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2017, 05:14:17 AM »

Great collective work, great end product! Our gratitude to all involved in the project, 8)
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Stefano

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Re: Mirage pack V1.0 - 20170930
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2017, 05:17:52 AM »

I'm crying for contentment  :D
Thanks to all of you modders
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[FAC]Ghost129er

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Re: Mirage pack V1.0 - 20170930
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2017, 06:19:09 AM »

Now THIS is more like it 8) Downloading right now, can't waittt!
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After all, the world is a stage, and a stage, is a world of entertainment~

taskf53

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Re: Mirage pack V1.0 - 20170930
« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2017, 08:35:40 AM »

Thank you for this very very fine Mirage 8)

I have a bug in my 412.2 ma 5.3:

When the plane has no more fuel it stays motionless in the sky. But the game dont freeze.

Best regards.
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urmel

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Re: Mirage pack V1.0 - 20170930
« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2017, 09:17:05 AM »

Thanks again 4S_Vega&Co!!!
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tarakanz

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Re: Mirage pack V1.0 - 20170930
« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2017, 09:24:05 AM »

many thanks
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Ivan-le-Rouge

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Re: Mirage pack V1.0 - 20170930
« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2017, 11:03:47 AM »

Hope they will be in the next BAT expansion. Great job and thanks to all involved.
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SAS~Storebror

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Re: Mirage pack V1.0 - 20170930
« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2017, 11:08:27 AM »

Yess!
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You've got no one to follow, and no one will follow you. Ain't that a relief?
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