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Author Topic: HMS Sussex and failed Kamikaze  (Read 15459 times)

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LuseKofte

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HMS Sussex and failed Kamikaze
« on: August 28, 2015, 06:06:14 PM »



Impression of a Ki-51 "Sonia" kamikaze on the hull of the HMS Sussex. The Sonia (reported as a Val, as often happened), is said to have hit the water before hitting the hull, probably losing its bomb in the process.

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gprr

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Re: HMS Sussex and failed Kamikaze
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2015, 10:18:58 PM »

Hello Le0ne

Greate find and presentation 8)

GP
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SAS~Storebror

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  • Failure is not an option.
    • What goes around comes around, you'll see
Re: HMS Sussex and failed Kamikaze
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2015, 01:37:40 AM »

Ouch.
That must have hurt.
I'm wondering if anyone opened a porthole now that apparently someone knocked at the door?

Best regards - Mike
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Stainless

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Re: HMS Sussex and failed Kamikaze
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2015, 02:02:22 AM »

I doubt he felt a thing.

Damned good flying though to hit that close to the water line.

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ggrewe

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Re: HMS Sussex and failed Kamikaze
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2015, 06:20:34 AM »

Classic face-plant ;D  But if the wings & gear show up - you know its must have been hard! Its like walking into glass door & not only leaving a face print, but ear prints as well  :o
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BalDaddy

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Re: HMS Sussex and failed Kamikaze
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2015, 03:13:41 AM »

At that speed probably left an arse print too, poor bugger.


Well presented explanatory graphic sir!
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sniperton

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Re: HMS Sussex and failed Kamikaze
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2015, 05:30:47 AM »

For me it's hard to believe that an impacting airplane leaves such a clear and detailed imprint of its cross section. I mean the bold contour line of the right wing and the fine details of the left. This is as much a 'miracle' as the Torino Shroud.  :o
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LuseKofte

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Re: HMS Sussex and failed Kamikaze
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2015, 05:31:05 AM »

Yes, you can´t help thinking that it might be some tracers after the pilot in the middle. I saw on youtube a interview of a surviving Kamikaze pilot, he had actually been on one mission.
They carried parachutes, and was ordered to return if possible if no targets where to be found. This guy in listed totally as a volunteer. By the time he was old enough , being a pilot was equal to die anyway, so he felt he could do more by being a kamikaze pilot. Anyway he was intercepted by US fighters and bailed out when his VAL was hit.
Lately there are questioned wether the Kamikaze pilots actually was "volunteers" . Trained pilots diaries tells a different story, when "asked" they had a enormous pressure to answer yes, and felt it like disgracing their family by saying no. The matter in fact almost 100% of those writing down their feelings , and already served as a pilot. Did not agree that kamikaze was the best way to utilize their capacity, they was convinced they had better things to accomplish as a regular pilot.
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ggrewe

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Re: HMS Sussex and failed Kamikaze
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2015, 05:37:40 AM »

At that speed probably left an arse print too, poor bugger.

Shame - the last thing that probably went through his mind was his arse! (literally) :o
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LuseKofte

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A hungarian pilots end
« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2015, 07:51:34 AM »

Capt.József Bejczy


József Bejczy
A detachment of four Hungarian fighter aircrafts led by Capt. József Bejczy took off from Veszprém to carry out a forcible reconnaissance flight over Szolnok – Cegléd in order to find out about the location of the soviet armoured units. Besides Bejczy, the members of the detachment were: Tobak, Huszár and Boldizsár. Capt. Bejczy spotted some traces of soviet tanks on the plough-lands near Abony, however at that moment they did not see the well-camouflaged armoured units. The detachment of Bejczy attacked these units and all hell broke loose: the soviet air defense opened horrific fire, but the fighter aircrafts flow in the face of the enemy and shot them intensively. The drop fuel tank of Capt. Bejczy’s aircraft was still on, so when it was shot down, the fighter crashed to the ground in light flames not far from Kostyán-farm. Capt. Bejczy did not survive the crash. On the following day the pilot was buried by József Husek Tóth by his own efforts, his grave had been tended until 1953 as the pilot was believed to be a German, but because of the ruling régime they had to forget the war hero. The Hungarian aviation archaeologists excavated the wreckage and the pilot’s mortal remains in autumn 2005. The production number of the aircraft was 126724, among the finds parts of Bf 109G-6 and G-14 were excavated as well. The military funeral of Capt. József Bejczy took place in Körmend on 2 March 2006.
Acrylic painting on board by
Vincze Ferenc És Ferencné.Original size:50x70cm.



During impact the 30mm canon was bent. Reference: http://www.repulomuzeum.hu/Hajtomuvek/DB-6052.htm


ollowing the idea of Károly Magó, the joining remnants of the Me-109 G6(G14) bringing Cpt. József Bejczy to death at Abony, are displayed together on a common stand. Engine, propeller blades (only two), cannon, left gear rod, and some sheet metal together after sixty-and-some years. Reference: http://www.repulomuzeum.hu/Hajtomuvek/DB-6052.htm
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LuseKofte

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On this day in aviaton history
« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2015, 08:20:00 AM »

This Day in Aviation History
September 1st, 1952
On 6:42 p.m., Monday, Labor Day, a tornado struck the flight line at Carswell Air Force Base, Fort Worth, Texas. 76 Convair B-36 Peacemaker intercontinental heavy bombers of the 7th and 11th Bombardment Wings, Heavy, were damaged, knocking out nearly two-thirds of the Strategic Air Command’s bomber force. The air base was left awash in thousands of gallons of aviation fuel from ruptured fuel tanks. An assessment team from the the Air Material Command was immediately sent to begin repairs. One bomber, B-36D-10-CF serial number 49-2051, of the 98th Bombardment Squadron, had been blown across the air base and into a ravine over a mile away. Its fuselage was broken in half and its tail and left wing were missing. Of the 76 damaged Peacemakers, this was the only one that was damaged beyond repair. All the others returned to service by 11 May 1953.


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