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Author Topic: WWII photographs  (Read 29539 times)

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Toobone

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Re: WWII photographs
« Reply #36 on: June 10, 2019, 02:37:56 AM »

Vladimir Kokkinaki ( at the helm of the “flying tank” IL-2 )


Vladimir Konstantinovich Kokkinaki (1904 - 1985) - famous Soviet test pilot, Major General of Aviation

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Toobone

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Re: WWII photographs
« Reply #37 on: June 10, 2019, 02:47:37 AM »

Personnel of the 189 Guards Brest Order of Suvorov 3 class, ground attack aviation regiment after victory at the walls of the destroyed Reichstag, May 1945



The Il-2 aircraft cell of the 6th Guards Assault Aviation Regiment during the combat mission. Latvia, August 1944



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Lagarto

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Re: WWII photographs
« Reply #38 on: June 10, 2019, 03:00:33 PM »











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SAS~Ghost129er

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Re: WWII photographs
« Reply #39 on: January 14, 2020, 12:39:32 PM »

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SAS~Ghost129er

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Re: WWII photographs
« Reply #40 on: February 09, 2020, 03:05:29 PM »


'Rocket acceleration proves too much for a Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet test airframe'

Found on Imgur.com, shared cause it's interesting - to me at least.
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SAS~Storebror

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Re: WWII photographs
« Reply #41 on: February 09, 2020, 11:12:57 PM »

Nice one Ricky.
However it's plain to see that the wing roots fail from excessive wing lift, the airframe sits on the trolley with like 5° AoA or so.
So this is not exactly an accelleration issue, but rather a wing assembly one.

]cheers[
Mike
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SAS~Ghost129er

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Re: WWII photographs
« Reply #42 on: February 17, 2020, 12:25:17 PM »

I just posted the gif - after being here for a while and thinking I knew it all; you guys put me to shame with my WWII warbirdie knowledge when compared to what all you guys know. :))

It was just funny to see such a thing on Imgur.com, and I rarely see quality content, so I had to share this immediately - but thanks for the explanation. I wonder, did they do it to find it's breaking point or were they just stupid when they rolled it at that speed with the wing at that angle..?
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SAS~Storebror

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Re: WWII photographs
« Reply #43 on: February 17, 2020, 11:26:21 PM »

did they do it to find it's breaking point or were they just stupid when they rolled it at that speed with the wing at that angle..?
Can't do much more than wild guessing so this is the best I can come up with from watching the gif a couple of times.
The thing looks pretty much like a full-scale Me-163B model, with all parts attached.
The trolley was bound to crash.
The mounting of the 163 model was not fixed, it was just "sitting" on it's CoL point.
The rocket acceleration seems pretty fast.
In summary, this looks like an early "free flight" test of a full-scale wooden model with weights attached in the fuselage.
The reason why the wings failed is guesswork again.
Rockets cause a lot of vibration, especially the crappy ones used at that time.
A trolley adds further components of vertical acceleration/vibration if the track isn't 150% plain and smooth.
The excessive vibration might have cracked the wing root while the model was accelerating along the track, and when there was sufficient lift to get the thing off it's trolley, the wing roots were too weak to keep it all together.

]cheers[
Mike
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SAS~Ghost129er

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Re: WWII photographs
« Reply #44 on: March 30, 2020, 06:04:17 PM »



More of this stuff here. Really worth taking a look.
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SAS~Ghost129er

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Re: WWII photographs
« Reply #45 on: May 09, 2020, 09:11:50 AM »

F.A.C. IRL on the SAS/FAC Dogfight Server:
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tomoose

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Re: WWII photographs
« Reply #46 on: May 09, 2020, 02:51:11 PM »

I've tried tipping the V1 in IL2 with a P-51 but every time it takes the tip of the P-51's wing off.  I know it is also problem just to disturb the airflow by getting a wing in front of the V1 wing but haven't been able to pull that off.
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Toobone

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Re: WWII photographs
« Reply #47 on: October 12, 2020, 08:17:11 AM »

Inscription on fuzelage: to A.I.Vybornov from Kashirsky schoolkids
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