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Author Topic: The ART of Flight  (Read 283206 times)

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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #48 on: September 08, 2012, 10:05:03 AM »

Max von Poosch, Austrian (1872–1968)

Kampfstaffel D3 über der Brenta-Gruppe (Fighter Squadron D3 over the Brenta Group), 1917




Abgeschossener feindlicher Flieger (Downed Enemy Plane), 1917


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max_thehitman

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #49 on: September 08, 2012, 03:16:26 PM »



Great link to that art gallery Purgatorio  8) Thanks man.
Excellent art!

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Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening ! Welcome to SAS1946

purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #50 on: September 08, 2012, 05:51:43 PM »

George Horace Davis (1881–1963)

Closing Up: A Bombing Formation of British Biplanes (DH9As) Closing Up to Beat off an Enemy Formation of 'Fokker' Triplanes, 1919


oil on canvas, 965 x 1524 mm

Quote
An aerial view of planes battling in the sky. There is a formation of British biplanes to the left of the image, and several German triplanes behind them. The background is obscured by a dense blanket of cloud.

Horace Davis was a little-known landscape painter who served in the RAF. He had instituted the aerial manoeuvre diagrams used in training pilots in the fledgling service, and was commissioned by the Air Services sub-section of the Imperial War Museum to paint two of these manoeuvres. The difficulty inherent in painting an eye-witness account of an aerial battle, and the emphasis placed on technical details and accuracy by the Air Service sub-sections, (a common feature of IWM commissions), makes Davis' work more literal and illustrative than that of painters such as Sydney Carline or CRW Nevinson. It is not the thrill of flying or the view of the landscape from the air that interests Davis, but the heroics of the toy-like planes as they chase each other through the skies.


Putting Out His Eyes: Tactics in Aerial Warfare, 1919


Oil on canvas, 98.4 x 65.4 cm

Quote
An aerial warfare scene with a German biplane under attack from two RAF SE5 biplanes. The German aircraft is in the foreground flying on a downward trajectory with the two RAF biplanes above. Two other biplanes are visible in the background. All is set against a cloudy sky.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/artists/george-horace-davis
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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #51 on: September 08, 2012, 07:15:33 PM »

I've always been fond of sketches and drawings, even more if they document the process of the creation of an artwork. Though sometimes rough, like the notebook of an writer they give insight in the ideas, inspiration and considerations of an artist. It's great luck if they survive as they were often disregarded and not considered worth collecting.

In S.W. Carline's case I actually prefer his delicate watercolours and sketches to some his oil paintings that IMHO are a bit crude. There's no accounting for taste :)


Sydney William Carline PART I

Carline joined the Royal Flying Corps in 1914. Later he was moved to the Department of Camouflage and sent to the Near East to record the war against the Turks.

Forced Landing in the Desert of a British BE2E near Nasarije, Mesopotamia, September 1919


Watercolour on paper, 272 x 367 mm


Study

Quote
a British BE2E biplane standing in the desert after a forced landing. Two men in RAF desert uniform and sola topees walk towards the viewer, each looking in the opposite direction. The featureless desert stretches into the distance and a plume of white smoke rises up from a spot on the horizon.


Over the Hills of Kurdistan: Flying above Kirkuk, 1919


Oil on canvas, 38 x 45 cm


Watercolour on paper, 266 x 325 mm


Sketch

Quote
an aerial view from the rear cockpit of an RAF biplane showing the tail of the aircraft and three other planes following behind. The town of Kirkuk and the outlines of fields, including an airfield, are visible below, and in the distance there are rolling foothills leading up to high mountains.


Temporary Canvas Hangar for a Biplane, Italy, 1918


Watercolour on paper, 208 x 275 mm

Quote
a scene showing a temporary canvas hangar with two sides pulled up and RAF ground crew manoeuvering a biplane into position. There is a line of trees to the right and the foothills of the Italian Alps are silhouetted against the horizon.


Dog Fight on the Italian Front, 27 June 1918


Watercolour, ink on paper, 150 x 215 mm

Quote
a small sketch of a dogfight between four German and two British aircraft against a blue sky and stylised clouds, which includes handwritten notes below. text: 'I want to give an idea of the jumble, the limitless space & at the same time the graceful & always balanced movement'.

'The picture that I have got in mind to do first is of a dog fight in the air...The proportions and positions of the machines are everything, as you may imagine. I have got more of the space, speed and grace of the machines, which is what I want. When it is finished I will go on to the 'Archie-burst over the Alps', but just at present this other one claims all my thoughts.' Extract from a letter to Richard Carline, 27 June 1918.


Three Studies of Flying Aircraft, Italy, 1918


Pencil, Watercolour on paper, 280 x 381 mm

Quote
a cartoon of three studies of biplanes in flight seen from the ground. The study in the bottom right shows a Sopwith Camel flying low over an airfield, with a canvas hangar and bell tent below.

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purgatorio

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WW1
« Reply #52 on: September 13, 2012, 11:43:52 AM »

Sydney William Carline PART II

A British Pilot in a BE2c Approaching Hit along the Course of the River Euphrates, July 1919


Oil on canvas, 40.2 x 47.8 cm


Study


Sketches


British 'Maurice Farman' Attacked by a German 'Fokker' While Dropping Sacks of Corn on Kut-el-Amara during the Siege of 1916, 1919


Oil on canvas, 40.5 x 30.1 cm


Study


Kut-el-Amara, 1919


Watercolour on paper, 271 x 300 mm

Quote
a view across a bomb damaged quarter of the city of Kut in Mesopotamia, seen from the roof of a house. Date palms grow between the houses, and the horizon is flat with only desert beyond the city boundary.


A Destroyed Turkish Aerodrome at Rayak, Lebanon 1919, 1920


Oil on canvas, 76.2 x 106.6 cm

Quote
The scene of a destroyed aerodrome. The remains of burnt-out aircraft, three nose-down in the earth, one on it's side with part of the fuselage still intact, litter the ground. There are piles of rubbish dotted around, and to the right a long pole, the remnants of a wind-sock, leaning towards the ground. The remains of two hangars can be seen to the left mid-ground. The lower half of the composition is in deep shadow, contrasting with the bright snow-capped mountains in the background.

'I went off to Rayak aerodrome by means of a Car going for rations. There I found the remains of the Turkish Aircraft Park, which had been badly bombed together with the large Ammunition Dump, adjoining it, close to the Railway junction. When the Turks left the place in a hurry they burnt all they could, and left behind them 30 gaunt carcases of aeroplanes, some standing on their noses and others in all kinds of positions, strewn amid rubbish on what had once been a delightful aerodrome in the plain between the Lebanon and Autilebenon [sic]. With their snow ridges making an attractive background to either side.' Sydney Carline in his diary entry for 18 March 1919 (from IWM Carline exhibition catalogue, 1973)


Study


Study


Study


Study


Study


http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/search?filter%5BmakerString%5D%5B0%5D=%22Carline%2C%20Sydney%20W%22&query=
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purgatorio

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WW1
« Reply #53 on: September 13, 2012, 12:08:16 PM »

Sydney William Carline PART III

View of the Wing of a BE2C in Flight, July 1919


Sketch


Aircraft Flying over Mountains, 1919


Sketch

Preparing a Sopwith Camel for Take-off, Italy 1918


Sketch


Ground Crew Working on an Aeroplane, Italy 1918


Sketch


Sopwith Camel Being 'Started-up' for Flight, Italy, October 1918


Sketch


Ground Crew Manoeuvering an Aeroplane, Italy 1918


Sketch


View from a Hangar, Italy, 1918


Sketch


Assisting an Injured British Pilot, Italy, October 1918


Watercolour on paper, 164 x 180 mm


Sketch


Sketch


Sketch




Sketch
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purgatorio

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Lighter-than-air
« Reply #54 on: September 13, 2012, 12:22:31 PM »

LIGHTER THAN AIR
Gow, Andrew Carrick (RA)

The First Zeppelin Seen From Piccadilly Circus, 8th September 1915, 1915


oil on canvas, 660 x 457 mm

A dark and gloomy evening scene in Piccadilly Circus with a German Zeppelin airship and barrage balloons visible in the night sky illuminated by the beam of a searchlight. In the foreground Piccadilly Circus is busy with civilians and traffic, including a red bus.

http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/search?filter%5BmakerString%5D%5B0%5D=%22Gow%2C%20Andrew%20Carrick%20%28RA%29%22&query=
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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #55 on: September 13, 2012, 12:54:08 PM »

John Lavery

'The Silver Queen', Wormwood Scrubs: One of the Original 'Blimps', 1915


Oil on canvas, 76.2 x 63.5 cm


'Rigids' at Pulham: 'R 23' Type British Airships at Pulham St Mary, Norfolk, 1918


Oil on canvas, 76.2 x 63.5 cm


'Rigid 29' and 'NS 7' at East Fortune, 1918


Oil on canvas, 63.5 x 76.2 cm


A Convoy, North Sea: From NS 7, Painted from an Airship off the Coast of Norway, 1918


Oil on canvas, 172.7 x 198.1 cm


The Aerodrome, East Fortune, North Berwick: The Starting Point for British Airships of the North Sea Air Patrol, 1918


Oil on canvas, 63.5 x 76.2 cm


Rosyth: The Principal Base of the Grand Fleet, 1918


Oil on canvas, 63.5 x 76.2 cm


The Firth of Forth: Wind, 1917


Oil on canvas, 63.5 x 76.2 cm


http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/artists/john-lavery
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/search?filter%5BmakerString%5D%5B0%5D=%22Lavery%2C%20John%20%28Sir%29%20%28RA%29%20%28RSA%29%22&query=chlight.
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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #56 on: September 13, 2012, 01:17:11 PM »

BBC News In pictures: Pulham St Mary WWI airship photos rediscovered



About 60 rare images of World War I airships operating from RNAS Pulham in Norfolk have been rediscovered by the family of the photographer. They were taken on the base by Royal Naval Air Service's photographer George Hamilton Wakefield from 1916 onwards.

LINK
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purgatorio

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LIGHTER THAN AIR
« Reply #57 on: September 13, 2012, 01:28:16 PM »

Henri Rousseau

Quai d'Ivry, c. 1907


46.1x55.0cm, Oil on canvas

In Ivry Quay (c1907), Rousseau depicts the airship La Patrie, which had only been launched in 1906. At the time, it was the most advanced military aircraft in the world and a source of national pride. Yet rather than gaze in wonder or flee in terror from this technological marvel, the strolling Parisians in Rousseau’s painting barely notice it as it hovers benignly in a peaceful summer sky.


View of the Bridge at Sevres and the Hills at Clamart St. Cloud and Bellevue, 1908


oil on canvas, 100 x 81 cm

http://www.wikipaintings.org/en/henri-rousseau
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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #58 on: September 13, 2012, 01:52:15 PM »

Johannes Jensen
Luftschiff (airship), 2010


1,5m x 4m x 3,5m

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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #59 on: September 13, 2012, 02:16:30 PM »

Odilon Redon
L'oeil comme un ballon bizarre se dirige vers l'infini (The eye like a strange balloon goes to infinity), 1898


http://www.wikipaintings.org/en/odilon-redon
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