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Author Topic: The ART of Flight  (Read 283184 times)

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Pivoyvo

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Re: The ART of Flight
« Reply #372 on: October 28, 2015, 12:15:59 AM »

Hello
Maybe someone wants new Wallpapers, with the thematic Art of Flight, here are some

https://www.flickr.com/photos/colesaircraft/page1
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purgatorio

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Re: The ART of Flight
« Reply #373 on: February 22, 2016, 01:29:42 AM »

Anna Airy (1882 – 1964)
was an English oil painter, pastel artist and etcher. She was one of the first women officially commissioned as a war artist and was recognised as one of the leading women artists of her generation.

An Aircraft Assembly Shop, Hendon, 1918



The scene is the interior of the Aircraft Manufacturing Company erecting shop and DH 9 planes are being moved through various stages of production. On the left, the fuselages are being constructed to be run up the ramp at the back of the factory into the upper shop. There the machines are fitted out and given individual numbers and markings. Workers are grouped together according to trades. The layout represents the first tentative moves towards the mass production methods developed by Henry Ford in the United States. However, skilled craftsmen and women are being employed. This is a transition from their specialist skills to machine-led repetition.

Before World War One, industrial production as the subject of painting was unusual. The source and manufacturing of consumer goods was usually ignored or deliberately concealed. The commissioning of artists to record these subjects during World War One reflects a curious change in attitude. These paintings were not only a means of recording and acknowledging the work force’s contribution to the war effort, but also reflects the wider population’s need to know that the resources to make the armaments to fight the war were there and being used.



Airco D.H.9

War time industry. Aerial power became a critical factor in World War One and Hendon, with its large training school, a focus for aircraft production. Production rates were critical; the wood and canvas structures of the bi-planes deteriorated rapidly and the development of fighter planes further increased losses. Germany had held the upper hand at the start of 1917, shooting down a third of all British planes on the Western Front in April, but their production fell significantly behind France and Britain that year and with the introduction of new allied machines, the balance of power shifted through to the end of the war.
 
The artist. Anna Airy (1882-1964) trained at the Slade with William Orpen and Augustus John and was recognised as one of the leading women artists of her generation. She was given commissions in a number of factories and painted her canvases on site, in awkward and at times dangerous conditions.
- from Art and Daily Life in World War Two by Roger Tolson

BBC Your Paintings - Anna Airy
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purgatorio

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Re: The ART of Flight
« Reply #374 on: February 22, 2016, 01:46:07 AM »

Flora Lion (1878-1958)
was an English portrait painter. Lion had a long and successful career and was known for her portraits of society figures, landscapes and murals.

Building Flying Boats, 1918



Flora Lion was a portrait painter who was given access to paint factory scenes in Leeds and Bradford during World War One. Flying boats [...] were used extensively by the British during World War One, notably for spotting German U-boats by following mathematically constructed search patterns. Although the technology of flight demanded precision design and the use of the aircraft was sophisticated, they are being manufactured using traditional carpentry skills. Workmen at benches, using planes and scrapers, are hand manufacturing the individual components for this most modern machine. Late in the war, Germany developed the first metal-based fuselage and these skills would shortly be made redundant and replaced by the production line. The need to have the latest technologies supporting the development and production of armaments was a crucial lesson from World War One. - from http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/trail/wars_conflict/art/art_daily_life_03.shtml


Women's Canteen at Phoenix Works, Bradford, 1918



During the war Phoenix Dynamo contracted to the Admiralty to build Short seaplanes. It produced millions of shells, a large quantity of machine tools and the fastest and biggest sea planes and flying boats. After the Armistice in November 1918 Phoenix Dynamo merged with four other businesses to form English Electric and Phoenix Dynamo became English Electric's centre for electric motor and generator design. - from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix_Dynamo_Manufacturing_Company


Short Type 184

BBC Your Paintings - Flora Lion
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purgatorio

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Re: The ART of Flight
« Reply #375 on: February 22, 2016, 02:13:38 AM »

Laura Knight (1877 – 1970)
was an English artist who worked in oils, watercolours, etching, engraving and drypoint. Knight was a painter in the figurative, realist tradition who embraced English Impressionism. During her long career, Knight was among the most successful and popular painters in Britain. In 1929 she was created a Dame and in 1936 became the first woman elected to the Royal Academy since its foundation in 1768.
During the Second World War, Knight was an official war artist, contracted by the War Artists' Advisory Committee on short-term commissions.


Dame Laura Knight watches Mrs Gertrude Frecklton Mrs Betty Williams at work on a dimpling machine.


A Balloon Site, Coventry, 1943



A Balloon Site, Coventry – shows a team of women hoisting a barrage balloon into position with the chimneys of industrial Coventry in the background surrounding the spire of Coventry Cathedral. WAAC commissioned the work as a propaganda tool to recruit women for Balloon Command and Knight's composition succeeds in making the work appear both heroic and glamorous.


Take-Off: Interior of a Bomber Aircraft, 1943



Take Off – a large and complex group portrait of the four man crew of a Short Stirling bomber, deep in concentration, preparing for take off which Knight painted over several months at RAF Mildenhall. Knight lived in the WAAF Officer's Mess while on the base and the RAF gave her the use of an obsolete Stirling to work in while preparing the painting. When Knight learnt that the navigator in the picture, Raymond Frankish Escreet had been killed in action she arranged that his family received a photograph of the painting.

BBC Your Paintings - Laura Knight
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SAS~Gerax

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Re: The ART of Flight
« Reply #376 on: March 11, 2016, 12:42:31 AM »

Franz Radziwill - Flandern – Wohin in dieser Welt? (1940 –1950)

http://www.kulturstiftung.de/erwerbungen-5/


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SAS~Gerax

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Re: The ART of Flight
« Reply #377 on: March 11, 2016, 12:52:22 AM »

Franz Radziwill - Inmitten der Mensch (1947)

http://franzradziwill.blogspot.co.at/2015_09_01_archive.html



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purgatorio

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Re: The ART of Flight
« Reply #378 on: April 01, 2016, 02:26:30 PM »

Norman Wilkinson (1878 – 1971)
was a British artist who usually worked in oils, watercolors and drypoint. He was primarily a marine painter, but he was also an illustrator, poster artist, and wartime camoufleur. Wilkinson invented "Dazzle Painting" to protect merchant shipping during World War I.




The LMS (London, Midland and Scottish Railway) at War Series, c.1939–1945

The London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) was a British railway company. It was formed on 1 January 1923 under the Railways Act of 1921, which required the grouping of over 120 separate railways into four.
The resulting company was an unwieldy construction, with numerous interests other than railway operation. Besides being the world's largest transport organisation, it was also the largest commercial enterprise in the British Empire and the UK's second largest employer, after the Post Office. The LMS also claimed to be the largest joint stock organisation in the world.

In 1938, the LMS operated 6,870 miles (11,056 km) of railway (excluding its lines in Northern Ireland), but its profitability was generally disappointing, with a rate of return of only 2.7%. Under the Transport Act 1947, along with the other members of the "Big Four" British railway companies (GWR, LNER and SR), the LMS was nationalised on 1 January 1948, becoming part of the state-owned British Railways.



LMS Express Train Being Bombed near Bletchley, October 1940




Blitz on an LMS Marshalling Yard near Willesden, September 1940




LMS Steamer SS 'Duke of York' and Other Ships under Fire



Built at Harland and Wolff, Belfast and completed in 1935, the Duke of York was a steamer passenger ship designed to operate as a passenger ferry on the Heysham to Belfast.
The Duke of York was requisitioned in 1942 for war service. She was renamed as HMS Duke of Wellington as there was a battleship with the name "Duke of York". She was converted to a "Landing Ship, Infantry (Hand-Hoisting)" the latter part referred to her hand operated davits; abbreviated to LSI(H).


Launch of 'TSS Duke of York', Queen's Island, Belfast (LMS poster artwork), 1935


The conversions allowed her to carry 250 troops and ten Landing Craft Assault to carry the troops to shore. She also received a 12-pounder gun and eight 20 mm anti-aircraft cannon.
She took part in Operation Jubilee, the raid on Dieppe on 19 August 1942, carrying The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada.
She took part in the Normandy landings in 1944. At the end of the War, she transported troops between Tilbury and Ostend.



Sinking of the LMS Steamer SS 'Scotia' off Dunkirk



TSS Scotia was a twin screw steamer passenger vessel operated by the London and North Western Railway from 1921 to 1923, and the LMS from 1923 to 1940.

On 1 June 1940 she was bombed by German aircraft during the Dunkirk evacuation. The destroyer HMS Esk came alongside and rescued nearly 1,000 troops. The destroyer HMS Worcester was nearby and also picked up some survivors. Twenty eight of the crew and 200 - 300 French troops were killed.



artuk.org - Norman Wilkinson
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purgatorio

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Lilium Jet
« Reply #379 on: May 19, 2016, 12:27:31 AM »

Lilium GmbH, Germany
Lilium Jet, since 2015



A start-up company hosted in an ESA business incubator is developing the world’s first vertical takeoff and landing aircraft for personal use. The electric two-seater will open the door to a new class of simpler, quieter and environmentally friendly planes available from 2018.

“Our goal is to develop an aircraft for use in everyday life,” explains Daniel Wiegand, CEO and one of the company’s four founders.

“We are going for a plane that can take off and land vertically and does not need the complex and expensive infrastructure of an airport.

“To reduce noise and pollution, we are using electric engines so it can also be used close to urban areas.”

Founded in February 2015 by four engineers and doctoral students from the Technical University of Munich in Germany, Lilium has already proved the concept with several scale, 25 kg prototypes and is now developing its first ultralight vertical takeoff and landing aircraft.
from www.esa.int - Personal aircraft aiming to take off from your home







lilium-aviation.com
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Alfie Noakes

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Re: The ART of Flight
« Reply #380 on: June 16, 2016, 12:37:56 AM »









Excellent resource for WW I paintings,photographs & posters......

http://www.pbase.com/johnglines/paintings_of_wwi

Cheers

Alfie
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purgatorio

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Re: The ART of Flight
« Reply #381 on: October 16, 2016, 01:00:10 PM »

Halil Alt?ndere
Köfte Airlines, 2016



Halíl Alt?ndere belongs to a generation of Turkish artists who have substantially shaped the cultural emergence of Turkey in the 1990s. His art explores questions of migration, identity and gender as well as the influence of contemporary Western art movements on the current creative scene of Turkey.

Halil Alt?ndere's latest work – which will be presented as part of Berlin Art Week as well as in the festival "The Aesthetics of Resistance. Peter Weiss 100" and which is a commissioned work by HAU Hebbel am Ufer – shows a group of refugees on top of an airplane. With this work, Alt?ndere is referring to the usually perilous journeys that innumerable refugees are forced to take on everyday due to the politics of the EU and many other states.


english.hebbel-am-ufer.de
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purgatorio

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Re: The ART of Flight
« Reply #382 on: October 29, 2016, 05:51:56 AM »

Mike Kelley
is a Los Angeles based photographer specializing in Architecture, Interiors, Commercial Spaces, as well as Aerial and Aviation Photography.

Airportraits, since 2014


Frankfurt am Main 25L - Missed Approach


Zurich Airport 28 and 16 - Visual Separation


Dubai International 30R - Sharjah


The Making of Airportraits: Chasing Planes Around The World
Mike Kelley, 17 Oct 2016

I just spent nearly two years of my life photographing airplanes and airports.

It wasn’t two years straight with no interruption, but it did occupy a good deal of my waking hours. Even if I wasn’t photographing airports or airplanes, I was planning how I was going to photograph them, making arrangements to photograph them, or staying up until 3am tracking airplane movements and wind patterns.

In March of 2014, I created the first image of this series, Wake Turbulence, which depicted an entire day’s worth of aircraft movements at LAX composited into a single image. The resulting work was plastered all over the internet, was named one of the top images of 2014, and even ended up on a Gestalten book cover which is now in museums and bookstores all over the world.


Los Angeles International 25L and 25R - Wake Turbulence

That image was supposed to be a proof-of-concept. ... read more




Mike Kelley - www.mpkelley.com
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purgatorio

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Re: The ART of Flight
« Reply #383 on: October 29, 2016, 05:59:11 AM »

Mike Kelley
is a Los Angeles based photographer specializing in Architecture, Interiors, Commercial Spaces, as well as Aerial and Aviation Photography.

LA Airspace


Aerial Photographer


Bottom Turn


Aerial LAX 1


Aerial LAX 2


Mike Kelley - www.mpkelley.com
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