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Author Topic: The ART of Flight  (Read 179549 times)

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purgatorio

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Korea
« Reply #192 on: December 06, 2012, 08:33:56 AM »

William Blasingame
Aim High: be a Naval Aviator, 1953



Korean War-era recruiting poster featuring artwork painted by artist William Blasingame. Issued in 1953, the last year of the war, and titled “Aim High: be a Naval Aviator,” the poster features the image of a jet pilot climbing into the cockpit of an F9F Panther and peering skyward.

collections.naval.aviation.museum
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purgatorio

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Korea
« Reply #193 on: December 08, 2012, 07:40:49 AM »

Herbert C. Hahn

Herbert C. Hahn was a Navy Reservist, a photographer, called to active duty when the Korean War broke out. He was assigned to U.S.S. Boxer and during his spare time aboard ship began making drawings of the ship's activities. His work attracted the notice of senior officers until they reached the Secretary of the Navy, Francis P. Matthews. On his request, Hahn was reassigned to the Public Information Office, Tokyo, as a combat artist. He spent the rest of the war following and recording the action of troops in and offshore Korea, particularly the armistice talks.

Course Zero Nine Five, 1950s


Pencil Drawing


High and Dry, 1950s


Pencil Drawing


Typhoon, USS Boxer, 1950s


Pencil Drawing


Windmills, 1950s


Pencil Drawing

http://history.navy.mil/our-collections/art.html
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purgatorio

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Tupolev ANT-20 Maxim Gorky
« Reply #194 on: January 16, 2013, 04:53:33 PM »

Tupolev ANT-20 Maxim Gorky

Vasily Kuptsov
Maxim Gorky ANT-20, 1934


Oil on canvas


The largest plane in the world ...

... when it debuted over Red Square in Moscow on June 19, 1934, the Maxim Gorky was one of the greatest showpieces of Stalinist aviation.

Andrei Tupolev was selected to head the construction project which brought together more than 800 technicians representing dozens of aviation workshops and bureaus from across the USSR. Work on the plane progressed from late 1933 through the spring of 1934. When completed, the Maxim Gorky measured 112-ft long and possessed a wingspan of just over 206 ft. [11 ft greater than the earliest Boeing 747s] In its initial configuration, the ANT-20 was equipped with eight engines, three on each wing with two mounted in tandem above. (Later, the tandem engines were removed when found to be unnecessary).

Like the airplane from which its design was derived, the Soviet TB-4, the ANT-20 was ostensibly to function as a heavy bomber. The plane did set a number of world records for lift capacity, but its was ponderously slow. Its maximum speed of 138 mph would have made it easy prey for contemporary fighter aircraft. In reality, the Maxim Gorky prototype was intended to be a propaganda platform. It was routinely dispatched to the Soviet hinterlands to generate support for the Communist Party’s policies. To fulfill this task, the Maxim was equipped with a powerful radio transmitter (known as the “Voice of the Sky”), a printing press, a photographic laboratory, and a projector to screen films for isolated rural audiences. Rows of lights located underneath the wings enabled the crew to display electronic text messages to spectators on the ground.


http://dictatorshipoftheair.com/2007/01/04/the-ant-20-maxim-gorky-in-flight/


CLICK FOR LINK

"News Paper Printed On Plane In Flight" Popular Science Monthly, March 1935







Maxim Gorky crash



On May 18, 1935, the Maxim Gorky (pilots – I. V. Mikheyev and I. S. Zhurov) and three more planes (Tupolev ANT-14, R-5 and I-5) took off for a demonstration flight over Moscow. The main purpose of the other three planes flying so close was to make evident the difference in size. As a result of a poorly executed loop maneuver (a third such stunt on this flight) around the plane performed by an accompanying I-5 fighter (pilot – Nikolai Blagin), both planes collided and the Maxim Gorky crashed into a low-rise residential neighborhood west of present-day Sokol metro station.

Forty-five people were killed in the crash, including crew members and 33 family members of some of those who had built the aircraft. (While authorities announced that the fatal maneuver was impromptu and reckless, it has been recently suggested[by whom?] that it might have been a planned part of the show.) Also killed was the fighter pilot, Blagin, who was made a scapegoat in the crash and subsequently had his name used eponymously (Blaginism) to mean, roughly, a "cocky disregard of authority." However, Blagin was given a state funeral at Novodevichy Cemetery together with ANT-20 victims.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tupolev_ANT-20




Levitana street 4 in Moscow (Sokol Settlement) damaged after ANT-20 "Maxim Gorky" crash. 18 May 1935


Maxim Gorky Memorial


Novodevichy Cemetery, Moscow http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=19219




If you are interested in Russian aviation, this book might be interesting:



Focusing on one of the last untold chapters in the history of human flight, Dictatorship of the Air is the first book to explain the real story behind twentieth-century Russia’s quest for aviation prominence. From the 1909 arrival of machine-powered flight in the “land of the tsars” to Stalin’s victory over Hitler in 1945, Dictatorship of the Air describes why the airplane became the most important symbol of industrial progress and international power for generations of Russian statesmen and citizens. The book reveals how, behind a façade of daredevil pilots, record setting flights, and gargantuan airplanes, Russia's longstanding legacies of industrial backwardness, cultural xenophobia, and state-directed modernization prolonged its dependence upon Western technology and, ultimately, ensured the USSR’s collapse.

dictatorshipoftheair.com
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Uufflakke

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #195 on: January 17, 2013, 01:41:49 PM »

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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #196 on: January 18, 2013, 04:08:09 AM »

Marcus Bunyan
http://www.marcusbunyan.com/
Thanks, Uufflakke :)


Martin Honert
Ein Szenisches Modell des Fliegenden Klassenzimmers (A Model Scenario of the Flying Classroom), 1995


Acrylic on wood, polystyrene and epoxy resin. Twelve elements: 157 1/2 x 236 1/4 x 157 1/2 inches; 400 x 600 x 400 cm (overall). © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2012.
Foto: David von Becker, Courtesy Johnen Galerie, Berlin und Matthew Marks Gallery, New York


A Model Scenario of the Flying Classroom (...) made for the German Pavilion at the 1995 Venice Biennale borrows its subject and title from a children’s book by Erich Kästner entitled The Flying Classroom. It telescopes the entire plot of one scene from the novel in which Kästner describes a rehearsal for a play that the characters put together. Despite the description’s length and detail, the reader learns little about the play’s content or actual performance. Honert’s art again finds itself trying to represent what is specific—the detailed description of the play’s rehearsal—but nonetheless vague—the little information gained about the play’s particulars.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Honert


Childhood memories are central to Martin Honert's artworks which will be presented by the Nationalgalerie in a comprehensive solo exhibition in the main hall of Hamburger Bahnhof. Derived from images that have been preserved in his memory as well as family photographs and drawings he made as a child, the artist recreates moments from his own past and transforms them into three-dimensional objects.

www.martinhonertinberlin.org - Exhibition at the Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin
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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #197 on: March 11, 2013, 03:23:58 PM »

Charlotte Austen, Jack Munro
Help For Heroes Spitfire, 2013


6500 egg boxes. 12 x 13m.

Eggs For Soldiers is a long standing fund raising initiative for the charity Help For Heroes. For the feature piece of this years March Fourth event, Micromega and Charlotte Austen created a full scale sculpture of a Mark I Spitfire covered with Eggs For Soldiers egg boxes, which was exhibited at the Imperial War Museum in Duxford.

CLICK FOR VIDEO





www.charlotteausten.com
www.jsmunro.co.uk
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BravoFxTrt

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #198 on: March 11, 2013, 03:41:46 PM »

Very Cool.
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max_thehitman

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #199 on: March 11, 2013, 08:54:32 PM »



A spitfire made out of egg-boxes, now that is very original.
I like the little wheels on it.  ;D
Thank you for the Art Show Purgatorio. Excellent !

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Alfie Noakes

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #200 on: March 14, 2013, 12:54:40 AM »

I've just spent a very enjoyable evening viewing pergatorio's Art of Flight area of SAS.......Art & Avionics are two subjects very dear to me !
Re: Fluxus and German Neo DADA............I'm not sure if all members are aware of Joseph Beuys experience of the Ju87....

WW II (1941-1945)
In 1941, Beuys volunteered for the Luftwaffe.[7] He began his military training as an aircraft radio operator in 1941, under the tutelage of Heinz Sielmann in Posen (now Pozna?) and they both attended lectures in Biology and Zoology at the University of Posen, at that time a Germanized University. It is also during this time that he began to seriously consider a career as an artist[citation needed].

In 1942, Beuys was stationed in the Crimea and was a member of various combat bomber units. From 1943 on he was deployed as rear-gunner in the Ju 87 "Stuka" dive-bomber, initially stationed in Königgrätz, later in the eastern Adriatic region. Drawings and sketches from that time have been preserved and already show his characteristic style.[3] On 16 March 1944, Beuys’s plane was shot down on the Crimean Front and crashed close to Znamianka, (then "Freiberg"). Beuys’s subsequent recount (1979) of the event became one of the most controversial aspects of his artistic persona. He claimed to have been rescued from the crash by nomadic Tatar tribesmen, who had wrapped his broken body in animal fat and felt and nursed him back to health:

“Had it not been for the Tartars I would not be alive today. They were the nomads of the Crimea, in what was then no man’s land between the Russian and German fronts, and favoured neither side. I had already struck up a good relationship with them, and often wandered off to sit with them. ‘Du nix njemcky’ they would say, ‘du Tartar,’ and try to persuade me to join their clan. Their nomadic ways attracted me of course, although by that time their movements had been restricted. Yet, it was they who discovered me in the snow after the crash, when the German search parties had given up. I was still unconscious then and only came round completely after twelve days or so, and by then I was back in a German field hospital. So the memories I have of that time are images that penetrated my consciousness. The last thing I remember was that it was too late to jump, too late for the parachutes to open. That must have been a couple of seconds before hitting the ground. Luckily I was not strapped in – I always preferred free movement to safety belts… My friend was strapped in and he was atomized on impact – there was almost nothing to be found of him afterwards. But I must have shot through the windscreen as it flew back at the same speed as the plane hit the ground and that saved me, though I had bad skull and jaw injuries. Then the tail flipped over and I was completely buried in the snow. That’s how the Tartars found me days later. I remember voices saying ‘Voda’ (Water), then the felt of their tents, and the dense pungent smell of cheese, fat and milk. They covered my body in fat to help it regenerate warmth, and wrapped it in felt as an insulator to keep warmth in.” [8]
While apparent eyewitnesses acknowledge that the pilot died shortly after the crash, they note that Beuys was conscious, recovered by a German search commando, and there were no Tatars in the village at that time.[9] Beuys was brought to a military hospital where he stayed for three weeks from March 17 to April 7.[10] It is not inconsistent with Beuys' work that his biography would have been subject to his own reinterpretation;[11] this particular story has served as a powerful myth of origins for Beuys’s artistic identity, as well as providing an initial interpretive key to his use of unconventional materials, amongst which felt and fat were central.

Despite prior injuries, he was deployed to the Western Front in August 1944, into a poorly equipped and trained paratrooper unit.[3] He received the German Wound Badge in gold for being wounded in action more than five times. On the day after the German unconditional surrender on May 8, 1945, Beuys was taken prisoner in Cuxhaven and brought to a British internment camp from which he was released August 5 of that year. He returned to his parents who had moved to a suburb of Kleve.  (Wikipedia)

FELT AND FAT FOREVER !

Thanks once again for a exellent website

Alfie

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SAS~Gerax

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #201 on: March 14, 2013, 03:38:24 AM »

J. Beuys as "Stuka Flieger"



and a pic from exhibition "5 years, 1979 - 1984" by Robert Adrian
at Neue Galerie am Landesmuseum Joanneum, Graz 1984
http://alien.mur.at/rax/GRAZ84/SOURCE/room4c.html

named "Joseph Beuys crashes his Stuka, Russia 1943"


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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #202 on: March 14, 2013, 04:49:13 AM »

first pic_ J. Beuys as "Stuka Flieger"

and a pic from exhibition "5 years, 1979 - 1984" by Robert Adrian
at Neue Galerie am Landesmuseum Joanneum, Graz 1984
http://alien.mur.at/rax/GRAZ84/SOURCE/room4c.html

named "Joseph Beuys crashes his Stuka, Russia 1943"

Interesting addition. Thanks, Gerax!

"In 1940, the story goes, 19-year-old Joseph Beuys volunteered for the Luftwaffe. Three years later, while on a mission, his plane crashed on the Crimean Front, instantly killing the pilot. Beuys survived. According to Beuys, he only survived because some Tartars found him unconscious in the snow and took him back to their tents to care for him. They covered his body in fat and wrapped him in felt to keep him warm. As he regained consciousness the pungent smell of the fat and the felt appeared to awaken his inner artist. That's how he told it anyway. The truth was probably a little more prosaic; he was rescued by a German commando and taken to military hospital where there was no fat, no felt and in all likelihood, no Tartars.

It doesn't matter whether the story is true or not, it was important to Beuys. It inspired him to create several remarkable works of art such as The Pack (1969), which consists of a Volkswagen bus with 20 wooden sleds, each with a rolled-up felt, leather belt, fat, rope and flashlight. The Story, as it came to be known, wasn't just an inspiration for much of his work, but a statement of his optimistic belief in humanity's ability to survive if only we cared for one another."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2009/mar/05/joseph-beuys-homogeneous-infiltration

The Pack, 1969


Photograph: Dan Chung

CLICK for more on Beuys during WW II (Wikipedia)
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SAS~Gerax

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #203 on: March 25, 2013, 01:43:55 AM »

Gravitas - An Art Installation in Landscape



read more here:
http://www.bombercommandmuseum.ca/gravitas.html

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