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The ART of Flight

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purgatorio:
As we had topics recently about modern art ;) I'd like to start a thread on the depiction of aviation in art in the broadest sense.

Please feel free to contribute whatever you enjoy or deem interesting. That's what this topic is about! :)


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purgatorio:
Eric Ravilious (1903 – 1942)
was an English painter, designer, book illustrator and wood engraver. He served as a war artist, and died when the aircraft he was on was lost off Iceland.

Tiger Moth, 1942



This was painted in the summer of 1942 when the artist was attached to an R.A.F. station at Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire. Other pictures belonging to this period are 'View from the ‘Cockpit of a Moth’ Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester, ‘View over the Starboard Wing of a Moth’, Air Ministry, and ‘Elementary Flying Training’, Imperial War Museum.


Morning on the Tarmac, 1941



Two Walrus aircraft on the tarmac of a runway with some personnel in the background. Only the very front of the foremost plane is visible on the right, with the whole of other plane set further back towards the left. There is a reflection of the latter plane in a puddle on the tarmac in the foreground.

IWM Collections - Eric Ravilious
www.ericravilious.co.uk


purgatorio:
Ian Hamilton Finlay (1925 – 2006)
was a Scottish poet, writer, artist and gardener.

At the Field's Edge, 1978



This work consists of a folded sheet of paper (enclosing a separate sheet of tracing paper bearing the inscription and other information). On the right hand leaf of the open sheet is an image of the flat-topped prow of an aircraft carrier, from a drawing by John Borg Manduca; text on the opposite leaf reads: ‘At the field's edge, on the vertiginous cliff-top, stood a solitary hut’. The carrier is represented, as in other work by Finlay, as an aspect of the modern ‘epic’ and ‘sublime’.


Sailing Barge Red Wing, 1975



Made in collaboration with Ian Gardner, this work is one of Finlay's characteristic images of visual coincidence. The image of a sailing barge and its reflection printed in red make a bird shape on the green ground. The Wild Hawthorn Press is Finlay's own publishing press based at his home, Little Sparta, Stonypath, Lanark (reference this and the other prints described here). It is Finlay's habit to work with other artists and printers, using them to visualise his idea and his visual concept by drawing or typography and then having the result printed to his own specifications. In this case the image was drawn by Gardner.


Homage to Malevich, 1978



The abstract shapes in this print are derived from the paintings of the early twentieth-century Russian artist Kasimir Malevich, one of the pioneers of abstract painting. By adding a plume-like tail to one of the crosses, Finlay transforms it into the image of a fighter plane, shot down in flames. Finlay has said that Malevich would have seen himself as ‘the best aeroplane’, and that the victim in the dog-fight might be Vladimir Tatlin, a rival Soviet artist.

www.ianhamiltonfinlay.com

Uufflakke:
Hans Liska.















Uufflakke:
Leonardo da Vinci's helicopter.

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