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Author Topic: Vickers Wellington GR.Mk.XIV Reconnaissance & Anti-Shipping Attack Aircraft  (Read 8073 times)

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Piotrek1

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Hello everyone.

Small ;D request for this beautiful plane.

In April 1942 the Wellington GR Mk.VIII entered service with No.172 squadron of Coastal Command. The GR.VIII was a modified Mk.IC bomber, with ASV Mk.II radar installed and in some cases also a Leigh Light. On 5 July, it sank its first U-boat, U-502. The next versions were the GR.XI, based on the Mk.X bomber with ASV Mk.II radar, and the GR.XII, which was similar to the GR.XI but carried a Leight Light. These three versions of the Wellington equipped 16 squadrons of Coastal Command.
The next versions were the GR.XIII and GR.XIV, both equipped with centimetric ASV Mk.III radar in a nose blister, and powered by Hercules XVII engines. The GR.XIII was a daylight version which could carry two 18-inch torpedoes, while the GR.XIV had a Leight Light for night operations, and rocket launching rails under the wings.
The last of 11461 Wellingtons was delivered on 25 October 1945. The Wellington had become the most built British bomber. In later years the Wellington was gradually retracted from frontline duties, and bombers and patrol aircraft were converted into transports and trainers. The last trainers were retired in 1953. Only two Wellingtons have survived to the present day.


 The Mk X was the basis for a number of Coastal Command conversions; the GR Mk XII was a maritime version armed with torpedoes and with a chin radome housing the ASV Mk III radar - in the nose it had only one machinegun. The GR Mk XI and GR Mk XIII were another maritime variants with an ordinary nose turret and mast radar ASV Mk II instead of chin radome; these variants had no waist guns. The GR Mk XIV restored the radome and added RP-3 explosive rocket rails to the wings.
 
 
The Mk XIV was the culmination of a series of maritime patrol and anti-submarine versions. It was equipped with ASV Mk III radar in a chin installation, a retractable ventral Leigh searchlight, and had the ability to carry eight RP-3 rocket projectiles as well as depth charges etc.The Mk XIV used the same Hercules XVII engine as the Mk XIII (1,675 or 1,735 HP). The Mk XIV was heavily used to support the D-Day invasion.


Wellington GR.Mk XIV
Role: General Reconnaissance Bomber
Number Built: 841
Service Entry: 1943
Engines: 2 x Hercules XVII engines
Loaded Weight: 31,000lbs
Maximum Speed: 250mph
Normal Range: 1,390 miles
Max Range: 1,760 miles
Ceiling: 16,000ft
Armament: 4 .303s in the tail turret and 1 .303 in each beam position
Ordinance: 5,000lbs of Bombs
or:
Armament:
2x .303 Browning machine gun in the front
4x .303 Browning machine gun in the Frazer-Nash FN.20A or FN.120 rear turret
2x .303 Vickers K machine gun in the waist position
4x 420-lb depth charge or
2x 18-in 1610-lb torpedo
8x RP-3 unguided rocket

Code: [Select]
Coastal Command variants
Type 429 Wellington GR Mark VIII
Mark IC conversion for Coastal Command service. Roles included reconnaissance, anti-submarine and anti-shipping attack. A Coastal Command Wimpy was the first aircraft to be fitted with the anti-submarine Leigh light. A total of 307 were built built at Weybridge, 58 fitted with the Leigh Light.
Type 458 Wellington GR Mark XI
Maritime version of B Mark X with an ordinary nose turret and mast radar ASV Mark II instead of chin radome, no waist guns, 180 built at Weybridge and Blackpool.
Type 455 Wellington GR Mark XII
Maritime version of B Mark X armed with torpedoes and with a chin radome housing the ASV Mark III radar, single nose machine gun, 58 built at Weybridge and Chester.
Type 466 Wellington GR Mark XIII
Maritime version of B Mark X with an ordinary nose turret and mast radar ASV Mark II instead of chin radome, no waist guns, 844 built Weybridge and Blackpool.
Type 467 Wellington GR Mark XIV
Maritime version of B Mark X with a chin radome housing the ASV Mark III radar and added RP-3 explosive rocket rails to the wings, 841 built at Weybridge, Chester and Blackpool.
Code: [Select]
Variants
 
Type
 Number Built
 Remarks
 
Wellington Prototype
 Number Built 1
 A prototype twin-engine bomber with four-man crew built to specification B.9/32 using aluminium geodetic construction with fabric covering throughout. Powered by two 915 hp (683 kW) Pegasus X engines with variable pitch propellers giving a top speed of 250 mph (402 km/h). Provision for single handheld .303 in (7.7 mm) machine guns in front, rear and dorsal positions as well as 4,500 lb (2,041 kg) of bombs.
 
Wellington Mk.I
  Number Built 181
 A total redesign of the prototype featuring a new longer, deeper profile fuselage with raised tailplane position, five or six-man crew and retractable tail wheel. Pegasus XVIII engines of 1,050 hp (783 kW) each with constant speed propellers gave a slightly improved top speed. Vickers hydraulically powered turrets were fitted front and rear with one or two Browning .303 in (7.7 mm) guns in the front and two in the rear.
 
Wellington Mk.Ia
 183
 Nash and Thompson FN5 turrets replaced the Vickers turrets front and rear. A retractable FN25 lower “dustbin” turret was also fitted, but it was later removed after operational experience had proven it to be useless. Each of these turrets was armed with two Browning .303 in (7.7 mm) guns. The airframe and undercarriage were strengthened to cope with increased weight.
 
Wellington Mk.Ic
 2,685
 The definitive Mk.I incorporated improved electrical and hydraulic systems to cure numerous problems, notably with the turrets. The dustbin turret was deleted and replaced with single beam Browning .303 in (7.7 mm) guns either side of the rear fuselage. Bomb bay modifications on 138 aircraft allowed two 1,610 lb (730 kg) torpedoes to be carried. Others were modified to carry the 4,000 lb (1,814 kg) “block-buster” bomb introduced on the Mk.II.
 
Wellington DWI
 4 (*+11)
 This highly unusual minesweeping variant featured a 48 ft (14.63 m) coil suspended from the nose, tail and wings of a Mk.I Wellington. A 120 hp (90kW) generator driven from a fuselage-mounted engine energized the ring creating a powerful magnetic field. As the aircraft passed low over the sea, this field would simulate that of a large ship and trigger any magnetic mines lurking below the surface.
 
Wellington Mk.II
 401
 Rolls Royce Merlin Xs of 1,145 hp (854 kW) replaced the Pegasus engines of the Mk.Ic. This change required a larger tailplane, which only partially cured some instability. Mk.IIs were the first Wellingtons modified to carry the 4,000 lb (1,814 kg) “block-buster” bomb.
 
Wellington Mk.III
 1,519
 Bristol Hercules III or XI engines of 1,370 hp (1,022 kW) gave a useful performance boost to this version. Other changes included the Mk.II’s tailplane, extra armour, larger and bullet proofed fuel tanks as well as barrage-balloon wire cutters on the wing leading edges. An FN20 four-gun rear turret was standard on all but the first few Mk.IIIs. Some aircraft were modified to carry two 1,610 lb (730 kg) torpedoes.
 
Wellington Mk.IV
 220
 Similar to the Mk.Ic except for the engines, which were Pratt and Whitney Twin Wasp R-1830s of 1,200 hp (895 kW) each. Not a success due to overheating and oil leaking problems.
 
Wellington Mk.V
 3
 A high altitude bomber featuring turbocharged Bristol Hercules HE8MS engines. Numerous problems with the engines led to it soon being dropped in favour of the Merlin powered Mk.VI. Other details similar to the Mk.VI.
 
Wellington Mk.VI
 64
 A high altitude bomber with Rolls Royce Merlin 60 series two-stage supercharged engines of 1,600 hp (1,194 kW) each. As it was intended to operate at 34,000 ft (10,363 m), a pressure cabin was provided for the four-man crew. Its only defensive armament was a modified four-gun rear turret, which could be sighted from a periscope in the pressure cabin and remotely controlled. A very troubled development was finally ended before it could see service by the introduction of better performing high altitude De Havilland Mosquitoes.
 
Wellington Mk.VIII
 394
 This maritime patrol version of the Mk.Ic featured Mk.I ASV radar with dipole aerials mounted above and each side of the fuselage and below the wings. Offensive armament was usually two or four 420 lb (190 kg) depth charges, although up to 4,500 lb (2,041 kg) of ordnance could be carried. Mines or two 1,610 lb (730 kg) torpedoes were also employed.

In those aircraft operating at night, a powerful Leigh Light searchlight was installed in the old “dustbin” retractable lower gun turret. This light was driven from the fuselage-mounted generator developed for the DWI minesweeper. A glazed nose for the Leigh Light operator replaced the front turret.
 
Wellington Mk.IX
 *?
 An unknown number of old Mk.I-IV Wellingtons were converted into transport aircraft at various places and designated as Mk.IXs. (See Mk.XV).
 
Wellington Mk.X
 3,803
 A development of the Mk.III bomber with more powerful Bristol Hercules VI or XVI engines of 1,675 hp (1,250 kW). An improved high-strength alloy used on the geodetic structure allowed heavier loads to be carried. A number were built as T Mk.X dual control trainers.
 
Wellington Mk.XI
 180
 A daytime maritime patrol aircraft similar to a Mk.VIII but based on the Mk.X rather than Mk.Ic airframe and engines. More sensitive centimetric Mk.III ASV radar was fitted, with a chin-mounted radome housing the scanner. The front turret was deleted and an observation dome fitted in its place, this was sometimes fitted with two handheld .303 in (7.7 mm) Browning guns. Offensive armament was depth charges or two 1,610 lb (730 kg) torpedoes. No Leigh Light was carried.
 
Wellington Mk.XII
 58
 This was a nighttime maritime patrol version of the Mk.XI. Similar to the Mk.XI except for the addition of the retractable Leigh Light and the lack of torpedo carrying equipment.
 
Wellington Mk.XIII
 844
 Similar to the Mk. XI except for the fitting of older Mk.II ASV radar. This radar used the Mk.I ASV’s drag inducing dipole masts and had similar performance, but was much more reliable. The front turret was reintroduced but no Leigh Light was fitted.
 
Wellington Mk.XIV
 841
 Similar to the Mk. XII, but was fitted with blast plates and rails under the wings to allow it to carry eight rockets with either 25 lb (11 kg) AP or 60 lb (27 kg) HE warheads.
 
Wellington Mk.XV
 *20
 A transport conversion of the Mk.Ia airframe, similar to the Mk.IX but modified by Vickers themselves. Unnecessary equipment was removed, including the front and rear turrets, which were faired over. It was able to carry sixteen troops up to 2,200 miles.
 
Wellington Mk.XVI
 *51
 Similar to the Mk. XV but based on the Mk.Ic airframe.
 
Wellington Mk.XVII
 *9
 A Mk. XI converted into a Mosquito nightfighter crew trainer. Armament was deleted and AI radar fitted into the nose.
 
Mk.XVIII
 80
 Similar to Mk.XVII, but with seating for four pupils and an instructor.
 
Wellington Mk.XIX
 *?
 A number of T Mk. X trainers were fitted with improved equipment and designated as Mk.XIXs.



Users:   Royal Air Force, Polish Air Forces, Czechoslovak Air Force.
General characteristics:
Quote
Significant Versions of the Wellington

Wellington B.Mk.I
Wellington Mk.I Specifications
General
Type: Medium bomber
Crew: 6
Engine
2 x Bristol Pegasus Mk.XVIII | 1050 hp | Pistons
Dimensions/Masses
Length: 19.68 m | Width: 26.26 m | Height: 5.33 m
Weight: 8417 kg | Max. Combat Weight: 12927 kg
Performances
Max. Speed: 378 km/h | Ceiling: 5486 m | Range: 2905 km
Armament
MG: 8 x .303 in (7.7 mm) Browning MG
Bombs: 2041 kg of bombs (inside)

Wellington Mk Ia
Role: Medium Bomber
Number Built: 187
Service Entry: 1939
Engines: 2 x 1,050hp Pegasus XVIII engines
Loaded Weight: 25,800lbs
Maximum Speed: 235mph
Normal Range: 1,805 miles
Max Range: 2,550 miles
Ceiling: 19,000ft
Armament: 2 .303s in the nose turret, 2 .303s in the tail turret
Ordinance: 4,500lbs of Bombs

Wellington Mk Ic
Role: Medium Bomber
Number Built: 1,685
Service Entry: 1940
Engines: 2 x 1,050hp Pegasus XVIII engines
Loaded Weight: 25,800lbs
Maximum Speed: 235mph
Normal Range: 1,805 miles
Max Range: 2,550 miles
Ceiling: 19,000ft
Armament: 2 .303s in the nose turret, 2 .303s in the tail turret, 1 .303 in each beam position
Ordinance: 4,500lbs of Bombs

Wellington C.Mk.XVI
Service conversions of the Wellington Mark IC into unarmed transport aircraft. Able to carry up to 18 troops.
Specifications lake Wellington Mk Ic

Wellington B.Mk II
Role: Medium Bomber
Number Built: 400
Service Entry: 1940
Engines: 2 x 1,145hp Merlin X engines
Loaded Weight: 27,600lbs
Maximum Speed: 247mph
Normal Range: 1,570 miles
Max Range: 2,220 miles
Ceiling: 23,500ft
Armament: 2 .303s in the nose turret, 2 .303s in the tail turret, 1 .303 in each beam position
Ordinance: 4,000lbs of Bombs

Wellington B.Mk III
Role: Medium Bomber
Number Built: 1,517
Service Entry: 1941
Engines: 2 x 1,370hp Hercules III or 1,500hp Hercules XI engines
Loaded Weight: 29,500lbs
Maximum Speed: 255mph
Normal Range: 1,470 miles
Max Range: 2,085 miles
Ceiling: 22,000ft
Armament: 2 .303s in the nose turret, 4 .303s in the tail turret, 1 .303 in each beam position
Ordinance: 4,500lbs of Bombs

Wellington B.Mk IV
Role: Medium Bomber
Number Built: 220
Service Entry: 1942
Engines: 2 x 1,200 Pratt & Whitney R-1830-S3C4G Twin Wasp engines
Loaded Weight: 31,600lbs
Maximum Speed: 229mph
Normal Range: 1,510 miles
Max Range: 2,180 miles
Ceiling: 21,250ft
Armament: 2 .303s in the nose turret, 2 .303s in the tail turret, 1 .303 in each beam position
Ordinance: 4,500lbs of Bombs

Wellington GR.Mk VIII
Role: General Reconnaissance Bomber for Coastal Command
Number Built: 397
Service Entry: 1942
Engines: 2 x 1,050hp Pegasus XVIII engines
Loaded Weight: 25,800lbs
Maximum Speed: 235mph
Normal Range: 1,805 miles
Max Range: 2,550 miles
Ceiling: 19,000ft
Armament: 2 .303s in the nose turret, 2 .303s in the tail turret, 1 .303 in each beam position
Ordinance: 4,500lbs or Depth Charges, or 4,500lbs of Mines, or 2 x 18in. Torpedoes or a Leigh Light

Wellington B.Mk X
Role: Medium Bomber
Number Built: 3,803
Service Entry: 1943
Engines: 2 x 1,370hp Hercules VI or XVI engines
Loaded Weight: 29,500lbs
Maximum Speed: 255mph
Normal Range: 1,470 miles
Max Range: 2,085 miles
Ceiling: 22,000ft
Armament: 2 .303s in the nose turret, 4 .303s in the tail turret, 1 .303 in each beam position
Ordinance: 4,000lbs of Bombs

Vickers Wellington T.Mk.X Specifications
General
Type: Trainer Aircraft
Crew: ?
Engine
2 x Hercules VI or XVI engine | 1675 hp | Pistons
Dimensions/Masses
Length: 19.68 m | Width: 26.26 m | Height: 5.33 m
Weight: 11940 kg | Max. Combat Weight: 16556 kg
Performances
Max. Speed: 410 km/h | Ceiling: 6710 m | Range: 3540 km
Armament
MG: -
Bombs: -

Wellington GR.Mk XI
Role: General Reconnaissance Torpedo Bomber
Number Built: 180
Service Entry: 1943
Engines: 2 x 1,370hp Hercules VI or XVI engines
Loaded Weight: 29,500lbs
Maximum Speed: 255mph
Normal Range:
Max Range: 2,020 miles
Ceiling: 19,000ft
Armament: 2 .303s in the nose turret, 4 .303s in the tail turret, 1 .303 in each beam position
Ordinance: 4,500lbs of Depth Charges, or 4,500lbs of Mines, or 2 x 18in. Torpedoes and Leigh Light

Wellington GR.Mk XII
Role: Coastal Reconnaissance Bomber
Number Built: 58
Service Entry: 1943
Engines: 2 x 1,370hp Hercules VI or XVI engines
Loaded Weight: 36,500lbs
Maximum Speed: 256mph
Normal Range: 1,435 miles
Max Range: 1,810 miles
Ceiling: 18,500ft
Armament: 2 .303s in the nose turret, 4 .303s in the tail turret, 1 .303 in each beam position
Ordinance: 5,100lbs of Bombs, or 5,100lbs of Depth Charges, or 5,100lbs of Mines and Leigh Light

Wellington GR.Mk XIII
Role: General Reconnaissance Bomber
Number Built: 844
Service Entry: 1943
Engines: 2 x Hercules XVII engines
Loaded Weight: 31,000lbs
Maximum Speed: 250mph
Normal Range: 1,390 miles
Max Range: 1,760 miles
Ceiling: 16,000ft
Armament: 2 .303s in the nose turret, 4 .303s in the tail turret, 1 .303 in each beam position
Ordinance: 5,000lbs of Bombs

Wellington GR.Mk XIV
Role: General Reconnaissance Bomber
Number Built: 841
Service Entry: 1943
Engines: 2 x Hercules XVII engines
Loaded Weight: 31,000lbs
Maximum Speed: 250mph
Normal Range: 1,390 miles
Max Range: 1,760 miles
Ceiling: 16,000ft
Armament: 4 .303s in the tail turret and 1 .303 in each beam position
Ordinance: 5,000lbs of Bombs
OR:
Armament:
2x .303 Browning machine gun in the front
4x .303 Browning machine gun in the Frazer-Nash FN.20A or FN.120 rear turret
2x .303 Vickers K machine gun in the waist position
4x 420-lb depth charge or
2x 18-in 1610-lb torpedo
8x RP-3 unguided rocket

Piotrek,
Cheers
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mojojojo

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cool!
+1
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i7 4790K quad core 4.4GHz/8GB DDR3-1600/ASUS Z87-A/ EVGA GTX 970 4GB/128GB A-Data SSD+1TB HDD/EVGA 650w 80+ gold PSU/ NZXT Source 530 gaming case

radko1111

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+1 nicee idea
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Kopfdorfer

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  • Potez 63.11 France's most significant AC in 1940

This is a good request , and a valuable aircraft , though I must say I would prefer an earlier version Coastal Command Wellington(Mk VIII or MkXI) in order to cover more war years.
Good Luck with this request.


Kopfdorfer
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David Prosser

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Good idea Piotrek1.

cheers

David Prosser
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