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Author Topic: France's Multi-role WW2 Combat Aircraft, the Potez 630 Series  (Read 30285 times)

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Kopfdorfer

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  • Potez 63.11 France's most significant AC in 1940

An addition to my recent argument for the representation of indigenous French Aircraft for IL2

The Potez 63 Series of Multi-role Combat Aircraft




(Most of this information was taken from the "History of War.org" website. I have made some minor editorializations - Kopf.)



The Potez 63 was the overall designation for a series of aircraft that between them were the most numerous in French service during the Second World War, acting as night fighters, day fighters, light bombers, reconnaissance aircraft and army co-operation aircraft. Sadly by 1940 the entire family of aircraft was suffering from a general lack of engine power, and was verging on obsolescence, although its impressive manoeuvrability helped reduce losses to enemy action.

                                  Potez 631
                                 

The Potez 63 was a low-wing twin-engined monoplane with more than a passing resemblance to the Bf 110. Like the German aircraft it had a twin tail, a streamlined fuselage, and the cockpit was covered by a long greenhouse canopy. The wings were low-mounted. The short central section, between the fuselage and the engine nacelles had parallel leading and trailing edges and no dihedral, while the outer sections had a clear dihedral and straight edges that tapered towards a rounded point. The horizontal surface on the twin tail also had dihedral. The retractable undercarriage folded into the engine nacelles.

Potez chose to build a prototype of the 630, and work began on the Potez 630-01 in April 1935. The aircraft took almost exactly one year to build, and made its maiden flight on 25 April 1936. At this stage it had a wooden tail with no dihedral. The prototype was slightly damaged in a crash on 6 May, but was soon replaced and sent to Villcoublay for official trials on 3 August. After some early trials the wooden tail was replaced with the production model, and tests resumed in November. The engines were replaced twice, until the prototype was using the Hispano-Suiza 14 Ab 10/11 engines, which provided 640hp at sea level, 700hp at take off and 725hp at altitude. With these engines the fully loaded aircraft reached a top speed of 286mph.

The second prototype, the Potez 631-01, made its maiden flight in March 1937. This aircraft was powered by the Gnome-Rhone 14 Mars radial engine, which provided 570hp at sea level, 700hp at take off and 660hp at altitude. Although the Gnome-Rhone engines were less powerful, they were also smaller, and the Potez 631-01 was only 4mph slower than the 630-01.

Production of the aircraft actually began in May 1937, before the letter of intent had been issued. The fuselage and tails were built at Caudebec, the wings at Le Havre and the aircraft were assembled at Méaulte, then at Les Mureaux.

Next to be ordered into production was the Potez 637 reconnaissance aircraft, followed by the Potez 63.11 army cooperation aircraft. This version would be built in larger numbers than any other, accounting for three quarters of the total production run. The order for Potez 633s was soon cancelled, and turned into one for Potez 631s. The first production Potez 680 was completed in February 1938, and the type entered service late in 1938.

Only the Potez 631, Potez 637 and Potez 63.11 saw significant action during the Battle of France. The Potez 630 had been withdrawn because of engine problems and the Potez 633 was mainly used for training.


The Potez 637 was one of the more modern aircraft in the reconnaissance groups, but losses were heavy. Production of this variant was limited, and the Potez 63.11 played just as important role in these group. The Potez 63.11 was also the most important aircraft in the army co-operation units, where it suffered heavy losses, mostly to ground fire and on the ground (although managed to hold its own against German fighters). By 1940 the entire family was outdated, with the lack of engine power and thus speed being their main weakness, but slow production of the more modern aircraft designed to replace them meant that large numbers of French aircrew were forced to fight in members of the Potez 63 family.

The Potez 63 was made available for export in 1937, and a number of orders were received, although only two were even partly fulfilled. The Potez 633 B2 was the most popular export model. After the French Air Force cancelled its own order for the bomber variant, these export aircraft were the only ones to be constructed, and they served with the Armée de l'Air.

Five countries ordered aircraft from France: China ordered four Potez 631 C3s and five Potez 633 B2s. Greece ordered twenty-four Potez 633 B2s. Romania ordered twenty Potez 633 B2s in a first order and another twenty in 1938. Switzerland ordered one Potez 630 C3 and one Potez 633 B2s. Yugoslavia ordered two Potez 630 C3s and one Potez 631 C3. Finally Avia in Czechoslovakia arranged for licence production of the Potez 636 C3, but production had not got underway when Germany occupied the country.

From these orders Switzerland received its Potez 630. Yugoslavia received one of its Potez 630s, but the other, a dual control trainer, was retained in France. 


Major Variants


Potez 631 (208 built)



        The Gnome-Rhone powered Potez 631 was the main fighter version. It was used as a night fighter during the Battle of France, but without radar was unable to intercept many German aircraft.
        On 1 January 1939 only 27 Potez 631s had been accepted by the air force, rising to 67 aircraft on 1 April, and 206 in August, completing the production run.
The Potez 631 entered service with the fighter director flights that were attached to each single-engine fighter wing (Escadre de Chasse), and with the night fighter groups (G.C.N. or Groupes de Chasse de Nuit). At the start of the Second World War a total of 206 aircraft had been accepted and 117 had reached front line units. G.C.N. I/13 and G.C.N. II/13 had 39 aircraft, four were in Djibouti, four were at Ajaccio and 70 were with the Escadre de Chasse (alongside a number of Potez 630s). A small number had also gone to GC II/8 where they replaced the Morane-Saulnier MS 225 and Dewoitine D.510 single-seat fighters.
       The allocation of Potez 631s changed significantly during the Phoney War period. At the very start of the war a new Escadrille de Guet (warning) I/16 was formed using aircraft from GC II/8 and from the fighter direction flights. This unit became E.C.M. I/16 (Escadrille de Chasse Multiplace) on 29 January 1940.

       In October a fifth night fighter unit was formed around the Potez 631. Originally designated as E.C.N. 2/562, on 1 January 1940 this was redesignated as E.C.N. 5/13. This was part of a wider reorganisation of the French Air Force, which saw the Escadres split into their component escadrilles and the smaller units formed into more flexible groupements. In the case of the night fighters Ecscadre de Nuit 13, which had consisted of G.C.N. I/13 and G.C.N. II/13 was split into E.C.N. 1/13 to E.C.N. 4/13. These units were allocated to the defence of Paris.

       On 17 January 1940 the French Naval Air Arm (Aéronavale) received eight Potez 631s, which replaced the Dewoitine D.376 C1 parasol fighters of Escadrille de Chasse AC1. Another seventeen aircraft were received in the spring and were used to equip Escadrille de Chasse AC2. The two escadrilles then formed Flotille F1C, based at Calais-Marck.

Naval Air Arm 631


      In February 1940 the fighter director flights were disbanded. Their Potez 630s became training aircraft, while their Potez 631s were used to increase the official number of aircraft in each night fighter escadrille from 12 to 18.

      The spring of 1940 also saw a belated attempt to improve the armament of the Potez 631. Although the type was meant to have two forward firing 20mm cannon these had been in short supply, and a number were built with one cannon and one machine gun. It was now decided to fit every aircraft with the two 20mm cannon and to add four machine guns under the wings. Although this decision was made on 8 February, by 10 May only two up-gunned aircraft had reached the front line.

       On 10 May 1940 the Armée de l'Air had 75 Potez 631s in front line units, with 53 of them serviceable. Four night fighter units were allocated to the defence of Paris and the fifth to the defence of Lyons, Etienne and the Le Creusot area. The day-fighter unit E.C.M. I/16 was at Wez-Thuisy. Finally the navy's Flotille F1C was at Calais.

       This naval unit was the most successful Potez 631 unit of the Battle of France. Between 10-21 May it shot down 12 German aircraft over the North Sea, losing eight Potez 631s. The unit then withdrew to convert to the Bloch 151 and Dewoitine 520, and didn't return to the fighting.

       The five night fighter units were not a success. They began to fly night operations on 11 May, but there were no successful interceptions during the first week of operations. The French High Command then decided to try and use the aircraft in the increasingly desperate day battle. On 17 May twenty-four Potez 631s from the units based around Paris attempted to attack German columns around Formies. Eighteen aircraft reached the target area, and six were lost, probably all to German flak.

       The night fighter units achieved their first success on 18 May, when an aircraft from E.C.N. 1/13 shot down a Heinkel He 111. Sadly on the same day the aircraft's resemblance to the Bf 110 resulted in Potez 631 being shot down by a M.S. 406 after being attacked by German fighters and French flak. Another Potez was shot down by three Bloch 152s on 23 May, and on the following day the Armée de l'Air ordered recognition stripes to be painted on each aircraft (5m long white stripes on the fuselage).

       From 20 June the night fighter units were forced to retreat south to escape the advancing Germans. At the end of the Battle of France the five night fighter units claimed four confirmed victories and eight probables, but at the cost of ten fighters lost to enemy action and three to friendly fire.

       The Potez 631 remained in use in small numbers with the Vichy Air Force. Two night fighter units, E.C.N 1/13 and E.C.N. 3/13 kept the aircraft. Eighty two aircraft were on strength on 1 November 1941, and 64 one year later. They didn’t play any significant part in the short-lived French resistance to Operation Torch. This triggered a German invasion of Vichy France in which they captured a number of Potez aircraft, but while the Potez 63.11 saw some service with the Luftwaffe, the same was not true for the Potez 631. 

        In the aftermath of the Allied invasion of North Africa and the German occupation of Vichy France, the French units in North Africa changed sides. The Potez 631s of E.C.N. 3/13 were used to defend the Gabès area against German attack, but were replaced with more modern aircraft later in November 1942.

Three Potez 631s were used by the French Forces of the Interior after the Allied invasion of the south of France. They were allocated to Groupe de Reconnaissance II/33 'Périgord' at Cognac, and were used to fly reconnaissance missions over the remaining German pockets of resistance on the Atlantic coast of France. After the war the same aircraft were used as trainers.




The Office (631)



Defensive Armament


Engine: Gnome & Rhone 14 M4/M5 or M6/M7 engines
Power: 570hp at sea level, 660hp at 16,400ft, 700hp at take-off
Crew: 2 or 3
Wing span: 52ft 6in
Length: 36ft 4in
Height: 11ft 10 1/2in
Empty Weight: 5401lblb
Loaded Weight: 8289lb
Max Speed: 275mph at 15,768ft
Cruising Speed: 149mph at 6,234ft
Range: 758 miles
Armament: Two forward firing 20mm cannon (one cannon and one machine gun on some aircraft), one flexibly mounted rear firing 7.5mm machine gun, and optionally two underwing gondolas of either 2x or 3x 7.5mm MGs.
Bomb-load: none


Potez 633 B2 Light Bomber (125 built)


      The Potez 633 B2 was a light bomber version of the Potez 63 twin engined design. Although it was initially ordered in large numbers for the Armée de l'Air, these orders were soon cancelled and only these aircraft ordered for export were built.

      After the initial trials with the prototypes of the Potez 630 and Potez 631 an order was placed for ten evaluation aircraft. At first this was to include two Potez 633 B2 light bombers, but when the order was confirmed this was changed to one Potez 633 B2 and one Potez 639 AB2 low-level attack bomber.

      The Potez 633 was structurally similar to the standard fighter versions, but with the middle crew position replaced with a vertical bomb bay, with the two remaining crew members separated by the top of the bomb bay. The aircraft could carry eight 110lb bombs, all in the internal bomb bay. The 20mm cannon were removed from the nose and the Potez 633 only carried three defensive machine guns - one fixed forward firing, one fixed rear firing and one flexibly mounted rear-firing gun.

      In December 1937 the first production order for Potez 630s and 631s was confirmed and an order for fifty Potez 633 B2s was placed. The plans for French rearmament began to accelerate during 1937, and Armament Plan V of 15 March 1938 called for 449 two-seat light day bombers. Most of these were to be newer designs, but an extra 75 Potez 633s were ordered on 25 March, bringing the total on order up to 125. This order would be short-lived. In May 1938 the French Air Force decided that all light bombers should be three-seaters. The Potez 633 couldn't be modified to carry a third crew-member, and so the order was modified to one for 125 Potez 631s.

      The Potez 633 BW was the most popular member of the Potez 63 family in the export market. China ordered five, Greece twenty-four, Romanian forty in two orders and Switzerland one. Production of these aircraft continued after the French order was cancelled, and as war became increasingly likely most were taken over by the Armée de l'Air (thirteen were delivered to Greece and twenty to Romania. The Greek aircraft were scrapped after the German invasion). By August 1939 nineteen aircraft from the Romanian order and three from the Chinese order had been accepted by the air force. On 1 September the first three entered service, forming an experimental flight within G.B. I/54.

      During the Phoney War period the Potez 633 was used to equip a number of Groupes de Bombardement d'Assaut to give their crews experience of using a more modern aircraft than the Potez 540 while they awaited delivery of the Breguet 691 and Breguet 693. At some point G.B.A. I/54, II/54, I/51, II/51 and II/35 used the aircraft, but as the Breguets entered service these units began to convert to the newer aircraft, and by 10 May 1940 only I/51, II/51 and II/35 were still operating the type, in each case alongside the Breguet 691. GBA II/51 was the only one to use the type in combat. On 19 May it moved to Etampes to support Groupement 18, taking with it eight Potez 633s and five Breguet 693s. Six of the eight Potez bombers were lost in operations between 20-30 May.

Engine: Two Gnome-et-Rhone 14 M4/M5 or M6/M7 engines
Power: 570hp at sea level, 660hp at 16,400ft, 700hp at take-off
Crew: 2
Wing span: 52ft 6in
Length: 36ft 4in
Height: 11ft 10.5in
Empty Weight: 5,401lb
Normal loaded weight: 9,921lb
Armament: Three 7.5mm machine guns, one forward firing and two rear firing
Bomb-load: Eight 110lb bombs, total of 880lb




Potez 637 A3 reconnaissance aircraft (60 built)


Reconnaissance version, with observer carried in glazed gondola under fuselage. Produced in significant numbers but being replaced by Potez 63.11 by the spring of 1940.

      The Potez 637 A3 was a three-seat reconnaissance aircraft that served in small numbers with the Armée de l'Air during the Battle of France, but that was already being phased out in favour of the Potez 63.11.

      The Potez 63 family of aircraft were developed in response to a French Air Force specification issued in October 1934, calling for a twin-engined two or three seat multipurpose fighter, capable of acting as a day fighter, night fighter or fighter director aircraft. The first two members of the family, the Potez 630 and Potez 631 were developed in parallel, and were virtually identical low-winged twin-engined monoplanes, with a close resemblance to the Messerschmitt Bf 110. After trials with the two prototypes ten evaluation aircraft were ordered, including one Potez 637 A3 reconnaissance aircraft. The Potez 637 was similar to the Gnome-Rhone powered Potez 631, but with a glazed gondola underneath the fuselage, designed to take a prone observer, and with the 20mm cannon in the nose replaced with a single machine gun.

       An order for sixty Potez 637s was placed in August 1938. The new aircraft was to replace the Potez 542, which was serving in four reconnaissance groups (Groupes de Reconnaissance, or G.R.). This order was placed some time before the prototype made its maiden flight, which came in October 1938.

       The Potez 637 began to enter service in May 1939, and was used to equip two reconnaissance Escadres - the 33rd and 52nd. At the start of the Second World War fifty three aircraft were in front line service, all with these two units. After the outbreak of war the Bloch 131, Potez 637 and a number of older Mureaux types were used on deep reconnaissance missions over Germany, but losses were so high that after September only the Potez was allowed to cross the border.

       By May 1940 none of the reconnaissance groups only used the Potez 637. GR I/33, II/33, II/36 and I/52 were using the biggest mix of aircraft, with Potez 637s, Potez 63.11s and the more modern Bloch 174, while GR II/52 and I/36 operated both Potez types. The Potez 637 was in the process of being withdrawn from frontline service at the start of the German offensive.

      The Potez 637 units suffered heavy losses during the short campaign in the west. G.R. II/52 lost all of its aircraft in sixteen days while G.R. II/33 lost all seven of its Potez 637s. As with the Potez 63.11, the main enemy was flak, both the very heavy German anti-aircraft fire, and Allied guns firing on what they believed were Bf 110s. German fighters were less effective, and the Potez 637 was often able to outmanoeuvre the Bf 109.

      At the end of the Battle of France only twelve Potez 637s remained intact in France. Six remained by 1 November, and none one year later. The reconnaissance units of the Vichy Air Force used either the Potez 63.11 or the Martin 167F.

Engine: Gnome & Rhone 14 M4/M5 or M6/M7 engines
Power: 570hp at sea level, 660hp at 16,400ft, 700hp at take-off
Crew: 2
Wing span: 52ft 6in
Length: 36ft 4in
Height: 11ft 10 1/2in
Normal Loaded Weight: 9,314lb
Max Speed: 270mph
Cruising Speed: 198mph
Service Ceiling:
Range: 963 miles
Armament: Three 7.5mm machine guns: one fixed forward firing, one fixed rear firing, one flexibly mounted rear firing
Bomb-load: none


Potez 63.11 army co-operation aircraft ( 925 built)

                     
                     
                     

       The Potez 63.11 was a three-seat army co-operation aircraft based on the general Potez 63 design, but with a completely crew compartment and nose. The Potez 63.11 was produced in greater numbers than any other member of the family, making up 725 of the 1,115 Potez 63s accepted by the Armée de l'Air before the fall of France.

      The Potez 63.11 used the same tail, rear fuselage, wings and engines as the standard Potez 631 or Potez 633 bomber, but with a completely redesigned crew compartment and nose. The slender nose of the standard Potez 63 was replaced by a much larger glazed nose, while the pilot's cockpit was moved back and upwards (moving from a position half way between the leading edge of the wing and the tip of the nose to one in line with the leading edge).

                         
                         
                         

      The Potez 63.11 was ordered in large numbers. The first production order, for 145 aircraft, was placed on 18 August 1938. It was followed by pre-war contracts for 70 aircraft on 21 September 1938, 200 aircraft on 16 December 1938 and 150 aircraft on 18 April 1939. This last contract was reduced to one for 60 aircraft for France, ten for Romania and 35 for spare parts in August 1939. Pre-war contracts thus totalled 475 aircraft for the Armée de l'Air. The largest contract, for 800 aircraft, was placed on 12 September 1939, after the outbreak of the Second World War, but this was soon reduced slightly to one for 725 aircraft for France, 10 for Romania and 35 for spare parts, bringing the total on order for the Armée de l'Air up to 1200. Only 723 of these aircraft had been taken on charge by the time of the French armistice in June 1940, although another 80 were complete at the Méaulte factory. Production continued at Les Mureaux during 1941 and a final 120 aircraft were produced for the Luftwaffe.

      The prototype Potez 63.11-01 made its maiden flight on 31 December 1938. It had a rounded glazed nose, but the curves in the glass distorted the observers view, and production aircraft had a nose with flat Plexiglas panels.

      At the start of the Second World War only five Potez 63.11s had entered service, and none had reached front line units. During the Phoney War period they began to appear in much larger numbers.

      The Potez 63.11 had been developed to serve with the Groupes Aèriens d'Observation (Army co-operation squadrons). In August 1939 these units were equipped with a mix of obsolete aircraft, including the Potez 390, Breguet 270, Les Mureaux 116 and Les Mureaux 117, while the new Dewoitine D.720 T3 was not ready for production. Instead the Armée de l'Air was forced to rely on the Potez 63.11. In November 1939 the aim was to have twelve G.A.O.s fully equipped and twenty six partly equipped with the Potez 63.11. Production was a little too slow to allow for this, but a creditable thirty-four G.A.O.s had received some Potez 63.11s by the start of the German offensive (an average of six each).

      The Potez 63.11 was also used to supplement and then replace the Potez 637 in the reconnaissance groups. Seven of these groups had completely converted to the type by May 1940, and another seven were using it alongside older aircraft. On 10 May 1940 a total of 238 Potez 63.11s were available to front line units, 396 had been allocated to units and 691 had been taken on charge.

      Sadly this doesn't tell the whole story. On 10 May 70% of the Potez 63.11s with the G.A.O.s were unserviceable, and large numbers were destroyed on the ground. Despite the large number of unallocated aircraft only 92 were available in the reserve during the Battle of France. Losses were also heavy in the air, with most aircraft being shot down by flak. At the end of the battle just under 500 aircraft remained, so around 200 had been destroyed during the campaign. The Potez 63.11 crews had made a valiant attempt to provide the army with its flying eyes, but sadly without having much impact on the course of the battle.

      The Potez 63.11 remained in use with the Vichy Air Force. Immediately after the armistice G.R. I/14, II/14 and I/22 retained the type in Vichy France and G.R. II.39 and G.A.O. I/583 used the type in Syria. By the end of 1940 one group had converted to the Potez 63.11 in North Africa, and a second followed in October 1941. In July 1941 Escadrille de Renseignements No.555 on Madagascar had re-equipped with the type.

      The Potez 63.11 in Vichy service fought against the Allies on several occasions. G.R. II/39 and G.A.O. I/583 used the type during the Allied invasion of Vichy occupied Syria in the summer of 1941. In May 1942 the British invaded Madagascar to prevent the Japanese from using it as a submarine base. Most of the Potez 63.11s were destroyed during the initial invasion, but one survived and was used to harass the advancing British columns as they slowly occupied the rest of the island, a campaign that lasted until 6 November 1942.

      When the Allies invaded French North Africa in November 1942 two units were still equipped with the Potez 63.11, G.R. I/52 in Morocco, G.R. II/63 at Bamako and the Navy's Escadrille 4BR in Algeria. G.R. I/52 lost all of its aircraft in American bombing raids on the first day of the invasion. G.R. II/63 survived until the French forces in North Africa changed sides. The unit was used to ferry ammunition from 12 December 1942 to 3 January 1943, at a crucial stage in the first attempt to reach Tunisia.

      Around 120 Potez 63.11s were completed for the Germans during 1941. They also captured a sizable number of Potez 63.11s after the occupation of Vichy France at the end of 1942. About 100 of them were sent to flying schools to make up for the desperate shortage of training aircraft in Germany, while others were given to the Luftdienstkommandos attached to airfields.


The Office




Engine: Gnome & Rhone 14 M4/M5 or M6/M7 engines
Power: 570hp at sea level, 660hp at 16,400ft, 700hp at take-off
Crew: 2 or 3
Wing span: 52ft 6in
Length: 36ft 1in
Height: 11ft 10 1/2in
Normal Loaded Weight: 9,773lb
Max Speed: 264mph (with lighter armament)
Cruising Speed: 186mph
Service Ceiling:
Range: 932 miles
Armament (basic): Three 7.5mm machine guns: one fixed forward firing, one fixed rear firing, one flexibly mounted rear firing.
Armament (maximum): Six forward firing machine guns (two in fuselage, four under wings), four rear-firing machine guns.
Bomb-load (only on aircraft delivered before 1940): 196lb internally (eight 22lb bombs), 440lb under wings (four 110lb bombs)


Hope that whets your appetite.

Kopfdorfer



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razor1uk

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Re: France's Multi-role WW2 Combat Aircraft, the Potez 630 Series
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2011, 05:19:31 AM »

A most informative posting Kopfdorfer :D
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Ala13_Kokakolo

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Re: France's Multi-role WW2 Combat Aircraft, the Potez 630 Series
« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2011, 05:25:51 AM »

Why there is no thread for french planes? I want the dewoitine as well!!
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Kopfdorfer

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Re: France's Multi-role WW2 Combat Aircraft, the Potez 630 Series
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2011, 01:21:58 PM »

Self Bump,

This was a widely used aircraft, and truly deserves consideration in the "needs to be modded" master list.




Kopfdorfer
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Joberg

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Re: France's Multi-role WW2 Combat Aircraft, the Potez 630 Series
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2011, 02:28:03 PM »

I agree. There are a couple of decent hacks out for this one but having it modeled right along with the other wips on the way would really round out the early westfront selection nicely.
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Kopfdorfer

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Re: France's Multi-role WW2 Combat Aircraft, the Potez 630 Series
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2012, 02:12:15 PM »

Here's a little propoganda bump ---

As of May 1940 , the French Airforce had on establishment a total of 1,604 Aircraft broken down into the following numbers by type :

764 Fighters
260 Bombers
180 Recon
400 Liaison

Between November 1939 and June 1940 the Armee de l'Air had taken on delivery of
723 (!!!) Potez 63.11 Multiuse aircraft.

                                                     

Even supposing that many of these were , like the rest of the Armee de L'Air , not completely fit for combat , and that many of the deliveries must have occurred in May and June 1940, this number represents approximately
a whopping 45 % !!!!! of all aircraft on hand at the time (for the Army - Navy not included).

This aircraft begs for a foster modder... or is it a modder foster.

This baby needs to fly.


Kopfdorfer
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Barkhorn

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Re: France's Multi-role WW2 Combat Aircraft, the Potez 630 Series
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2012, 04:57:21 PM »

Another badly needed plane!!! I think someone started one some time ago...
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agracier

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Re: France's Multi-role WW2 Combat Aircraft, the Potez 630 Series
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2012, 01:53:44 AM »

a bump from me too for this series ... and if anyone needs a template for this plane if they should ever start on a 3D model, let me know ... I can help with that
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cgagan

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Re: France's Multi-role WW2 Combat Aircraft, the Potez 630 Series
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2012, 02:06:14 AM »

Great plane, indeed! If I recall correctly, Claymore has announced that this is an ongoing project, started by a friend of his, sometime ago...
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C6_Claymore

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Re: France's Multi-role WW2 Combat Aircraft, the Potez 630 Series
« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2012, 04:13:56 AM »

Great plane, indeed! If I recall correctly, Claymore has announced that this is an ongoing project, started by a friend of his, sometime ago...

Yes, this Potez 633 is started since 2005 by PA_Bluestone and I help him to import the current model in game:







80/90 % of D0 model is done, Damage models and LODS are to build and, the most important, java editing and FM before importation for testing correctly... any help is warmed welcome ;)
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Cooler Master Cosmos 2 SE, Intel core i7 950 3.1, Asus Z87-A, Nvidia Geforce GTX 580, 8 Go DDR3, Corsair 750W, Samsung Syncmaster 2232BW 22" & 2032BW 20", W7, Sa

Kopfdorfer

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  • Potez 63.11 France's most significant AC in 1940
Re: France's Multi-role WW2 Combat Aircraft, the Potez 630 Series
« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2012, 08:43:56 AM »

That is faaaaaantastic Claymore!
Hoorah!

Here's a nice skin :



Kopfdorfer
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