Special Aircraft Service

the SAS Hangar => The Lounge => Topic started by: Flanker27 on October 09, 2019, 07:24:24 AM

Title: Dropping a load at 30,000 feet
Post by: Flanker27 on October 09, 2019, 07:24:24 AM
It had to be asked at some point, my question is simple how do you go to the bathroom at 30,000 feet in your aircraft? Iv done a little research on the matter in the past and know of Lancaster bombers having an Elsan closet, and B-17s had a toilet as well. my grandfather said however that using it was a mission all on its own and if you were not careful your ass cheeks would freeze to the seat. i also assume that some aircraft had the simple relief tube like on king airs. does anyone else know of any other aircraft with toilets in them form WW2? and possibly how they worked?
Title: Re: Dropping a load at 30,000 feet
Post by: SAS~Storebror on October 09, 2019, 10:37:10 AM
simple relief tube like on king airs
That's what we've had on our Sea Kings.
No clue about WW2 kites, sorry.

]cheers[
Mike
Title: Re: Dropping a load at 30,000 feet
Post by: Alfie Noakes on October 09, 2019, 01:42:50 PM
Sikorsky S-22 Ilya Muromets had toilet fitted in 1913   8)

WW II (just) ........Ladies & Gentlemen........I give you.......The Supermarine Stranraer

Operational history (wiki)


In service, only 17 Stranraers were operated by the RAF 1937–1941 primarily by No. 228, No, 209 and No. 240 Squadrons along with limited numbers at the No. 4 OTU. Generally, the aircraft was not well-received as its performance was considered marginal.[1]

Due to its less than favourable reception by flight and ground crews, the Stranraer gained a large number of derisive nicknames. It was sometimes referred to as a "whistling shithouse" because the toilet opened out directly to the air and when the seat was lifted, the airflow caused the toilet to whistle   :))

Cheers

Alfie
Title: Re: Dropping a load at 30,000 feet
Post by: Knochenlutscher on October 09, 2019, 01:46:53 PM
There is a famous Canadian WW2 Aviation site that has this topic covered.

Another article I found on a US site years ago showing a relief bag (Rubber/Plastic) which
was the personal mount of a Stang Pilot in ETO.
Title: Re: Dropping a load at 30,000 feet
Post by: Flanker27 on October 09, 2019, 02:47:22 PM
Whistling shithouse eh? I can imagine that made said throne a lot of fun to use at altitude and speed 
Title: Re: Dropping a load at 30,000 feet
Post by: Gubi on October 09, 2019, 03:47:55 PM
…"pinchin' a loaf...just pinchin' a loaf!"...that lyric?
Title: Re: Dropping a load at 30,000 feet
Post by: Knochenlutscher on October 09, 2019, 04:17:04 PM
http://www.vintagewings.ca/VintageNews/Stories/tabid/116/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/400/When-ya-gotta-go.aspx (http://www.vintagewings.ca/VintageNews/Stories/tabid/116/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/400/When-ya-gotta-go.aspx)
Title: Re: Dropping a load at 30,000 feet
Post by: Gubi on October 09, 2019, 04:46:19 PM
Very good K.  Indeed...it can be a religious experience.  For real.  Prost
Title: Re: Dropping a load at 30,000 feet
Post by: SAS~Storebror on October 10, 2019, 12:52:37 AM
Nice find Knochen, a really good read ;D
Title: Re: Dropping a load at 30,000 feet
Post by: BalDaddy on October 10, 2019, 03:03:09 AM
The problem with altitude is of course that piss tubes and elsans freeze. I recall one story of a Halifax having to abort a mission because the navigator was rendered unconscious by slipping on frozen urine that overflowed from a frozen piss pipe overused due to a nervous crew on their first mission.
Title: Re: Dropping a load at 30,000 feet
Post by: SAS~Storebror on October 10, 2019, 03:59:45 AM
I understand that the elsan is a problem whether it freezes or not.
In frozen condition, at least it would keep it's contents within 8)
Title: Re: Dropping a load at 30,000 feet
Post by: Flanker27 on October 10, 2019, 04:17:59 AM
Sounds a bit like a port a John, having been at reenactments when they are frozen it’s fine, it’s only when it’s 96 degrees and stewing all day in the sun do they get real fun to use