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Author Topic: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress by Ranwers - V1.1 patch 20180817  (Read 9206 times)

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4S_Vega

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Boeing B-52 Stratofortress by Ranwers

Patch 1.1
Quote
-Fix aerial refuel capability

air.ini
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B-52D         air.B_52D 1            NOINFO  usa01   SUMMER
B-52F         air.B_52F 1            NOINFO  usa01   SUMMER
B-52H         air.B_52H 1            NOINFO  usa01   SUMMER
B-52H-Late    air.B_52H_Late 1              NOINFO  usa01   SUMMER

plane
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B-52D      Boeing B-52D Stratofortress, 1956
B-52F      Boeing B-52F Stratofortress, 1957
B-52H      Boeing B-52H Stratofortress(Early), 1971
B-52H-Late        Boeing B-52H Stratofortress(Late), 2001


Quote
B-52
On 23 November 1945, Air Materiel Command (AMC) issued desired performance characteristics for a new strategic bomber "capable of carrying out the strategic mission without dependence upon advanced and intermediate bases controlled by other countries". The aircraft was to have a crew of five or more turret gunners, and a six-man relief crew. It was required to cruise at 300 mph (260 knots, 480 km/h) at 34,000 feet (10,400 m) with a combat radius of 5,000 miles (4,300 nautical miles, 8,000 km). The armament was to consist of an unspecified number of 20 mm cannon and 10,000 pounds (4,500 kg) of bombs. On 13 February 1946, the Air Force issued bid invitations for these specifications, with Boeing, Consolidated Aircraft, and Glenn L. Martin Company submitting proposals.

On 5 June 1946, Boeing's Model 462, a straight-wing aircraft powered by six Wright T35 turboprops with a gross weight of 360,000 pounds (160,000 kg) and a combat radius of 3,110 miles (2,700 nmi, 5,010 km), was declared the winner. On 28 June 1946, Boeing was issued a letter of contract for US$1.7 million to build a full-scale mock-up of the new XB-52 and do preliminary engineering and testing.[20] However, by October 1946, the air force began to express concern about the sheer size of the new aircraft and its inability to meet the specified design requirements. In response, Boeing produced Model 464, a smaller four-engine version with a 230,000 pound (105,000 kg) gross weight, which was briefly deemed acceptable.

Subsequently, in November 1946, the Deputy Chief of Air Staff for Research and Development, General Curtis LeMay, expressed the desire for a cruise speed of 400 miles per hour (345 kn, 645 km/h), to which Boeing responded with a 300,000 lb (136,000 kg) aircraft. In December 1946, Boeing was asked to change their design to a four-engine bomber with a top speed of 400 miles per hour, range of 12,000 miles (10,000 nmi, 19,300 km), and the ability to carry a nuclear weapon; in total, the aircraft could weigh up to 480,000 pounds (220,000 kg).[24] Boeing responded with two models powered by T35 turboprops. The Model 464-16 was a "nuclear only" bomber with a 10,000 pound (4,500 kg) payload, while the Model 464-17 was a general purpose bomber with a 9,000 pound (4,000 kg) payload. Due to the cost associated with purchasing two specialized aircraft, the air force selected Model 464-17 with the understanding that it could be adapted for nuclear strikes.[25]

In June 1947, the military requirements were updated and the Model 464-17 met all of them except for the range. It was becoming obvious to the Air Force that, even with the updated performance, the XB-52 would be obsolete by the time it entered production and would offer little improvement over the Convair B-36; as a result, the entire project was postponed for six months. During this time, Boeing continued to perfect the design, which resulted in the Model 464-29 with a top speed of 455 miles per hour (395 kn, 730 km/h) and a 5,000-mile range. In September 1947, the Heavy Bombardment Committee was convened to ascertain performance requirements for a nuclear bomber. Formalized on 8 December 1947, these requirements called for a top speed of 500 miles per hour (440 kn, 800 km/h) and an 8,000 mile (7,000 nmi, 13,000 km) range, far beyond the capabilities of 464-29.

The outright cancellation of the Boeing contract on 11 December 1947 was staved off by a plea from its president William McPherson Allen to the Secretary of the Air Force Stuart Symington. Allen reasoned that the design was capable of being adapted to new aviation technology and more stringent requirements. In January 1948 Boeing was instructed to thoroughly explore recent technological innovations, including aerial refueling and the flying wing. Noting stability and control problems Northrop was experiencing with their YB-35 and YB-49 flying wing bombers, Boeing insisted on a conventional aircraft, and in April 1948 presented a US$30 million (US$306 million today) proposal for design, construction, and testing of two Model 464-35 prototypes. Further revisions during 1948 resulted in an aircraft with a top speed of 513 miles per hour (445 kn, 825 km/h) at 35,000 feet (10,700 m), a range of 6,909 miles (6,005 nmi, 11,125 km), and a 280,000 pounds (125,000 kg) gross weight, which included 10,000 pounds (4,500 kg) of bombs and 19,875 US gallons (75,225 L) of fuel.

In May 1948, AMC asked Boeing to incorporate the previously discarded, but now more fuel-efficient, jet engine into the design. That resulted in the development of yet another revision—in July 1948, Model 464-40 substituted Westinghouse J40 turbojets for the turboprops. The Air Force project officer who reviewed the Model 464-40 was favorably impressed, especially since he had already been thinking along similar lines. Nevertheless, the government was concerned about the high fuel consumption rate of the jet engines of the day, and directed that Boeing still use the turboprop-powered Model 464-35 as the basis for the XB-52. Although he agreed that turbojet propulsion was the future, General Howard A. Craig, Deputy Chief of Staff for Material, was not very keen on a jet-powered B-52, since he felt that the jet engine had not yet progressed sufficiently to permit skipping an intermediate turboprop stage. However, Boeing was encouraged to continue turbojet studies even without any expected commitment to jet propulsion.

The YB-52, the second XB-52 modified with more operational equipment, first flew on 15 April 1952 with "Tex" Johnston as pilot. During ground testing on 29 November 1951, the XB-52's pneumatic system failed during a full-pressure test; the resulting explosion severely damaged the trailing edge of the wing, necessitating considerable repairs. A two-hour, 21-minute proving flight from Boeing Field, King County, in Seattle, Washington to Larson AFB was undertaken with Boeing test pilot Johnston and air force Lieutenant Colonel Guy M. Townsend. The XB-52 followed on 2 October 1952. The thorough development, including 670 days in the wind tunnel and 130 days of aerodynamic and aeroelastic testing, paid off with smooth flight testing. Encouraged, the air force increased its order to 282 B-52s.

Only three of the 13 B-52As ordered were built.All were returned to Boeing, and used in their test program. On 9 June 1952, the February 1951 contract was updated to order the aircraft under new specifications. The final 10, the first aircraft to enter active service, were completed as B-52Bs. At the roll out ceremony on 18 March 1954, Air Force Chief of Staff General Nathan Twining said:

The B-52 shared many technological similarities with the preceding Boeing B-47 Stratojet strategic bomber. The two aircraft used the same basic design, such as swept wings and podded jet engines,[85] and the cabin included the crew ejection systems.[86] On the B-52D, the pilots and electronic countermeasures (EDM) operator ejected upwards, while the lower deck crew ejected downwards; until the B-52G, the gunner had to jettison the tail gun to bail out.

tructural fatigue was accelerated by at least a factor of eight in a low-altitude flight profile over that of high-altitude flying, requiring costly repairs to extend service life. In the early 1960s, the three-phase High Stress program was launched to counter structural fatigue, enrolling aircraft at 2,000 flying hours. Follow-up programs were conducted, such as a 2,000-hour service life extension to select airframes in 1966–1968, and the extensive Pacer Plank reskinning, completed in 1977.[75][91] The wet wing introduced on G and H models was even more susceptible to fatigue, experiencing 60% more stress during flight than the old wing. The wings were modified by 1964 under ECP 1050. This was followed by a fuselage skin and longeron replacement (ECP 1185) in 1966, and the B-52 Stability Augmentation and Flight Control program (ECP 1195) in 1967. Fuel leaks due to deteriorating Marman clamps continued to plague all variants of the B-52. To this end, the aircraft were subjected to Blue Band (1957), Hard Shell (1958), and finally QuickClip (1958) programs. The latter fitted safety straps that prevented catastrophic loss of fuel in case of clamp failure. The B-52's service ceiling is officially listed as 50,000 feet, but operational experience shows this is difficult to reach when fully laden with bombs. According to one source: "The optimal altitude for a combat mission was around 43,000 feet, because to exceed that height would rapidly degrade the plane's range."

In September 2006, the B-52 became one of the first US military aircraft to fly using alternative fuel. It took off from Edwards Air Force Base with a 50/50 blend of Fischer–Tropsch process (FT) synthetic fuel and conventional JP-8 jet fuel, which burned in two of the eight engines.[95] On 15 December 2006, a B-52 took off from Edwards with the synthetic fuel powering all eight engines, the first time an air force aircraft was entirely powered by the blend. The seven-hour flight was considered a success. This program is part of the Department of Defense Assured Fuel Initiative, which aims to reduce crude oil usage and obtain half of its aviation fuel from alternative sources by 2016. On 8 August 2007, Air Force Secretary Michael Wynne certified the B-52H as fully approved to use the FT blend.

B-52D
B-52DThe B-52D was a dedicated long-range bomber without a reconnaissance option. The Big Belly modifications allowed the B-52D to carry heavy loads of conventional bombs for carpet bombing over Vietnam, while the Rivet Rambler modification added the Phase V ECM systems, which was better than the systems used on most later B-52s. Because of these upgrades and its long range capabilities, the D model was used more extensively in Vietnam than any other model. Aircraft assigned to Vietnam were painted in a camouflage colour scheme with black bellies to defeat searchlights.



B-52F
This aircraft was given J57-P-43W engines with a larger capacity water injection system to provide greater thrust than previous models. This model had problems with fuel leaks which were eventually solved by several service modifications: Blue Band, Hard Shell, and QuickClip.


B-52H
B-52HThe B-52H had the same crew and structural changes as the B-52G. The most significant upgrade was the switch to TF33-P-3 turbofan engines which, despite the initial reliability problems (corrected by 1964 under the Hot Fan program), offered considerably better performance and fuel economy than the J57 turbojets.

The ECM and avionics were updated, a new fire control system was fitted, and the rear defensive armament was changed from machine guns to a 20 mm M61 Vulcan cannon (later removed in 1991–94). The final 18 aircraft were manufactured with provision for the ADR-8 countermeasures rocket, which was later retrofitted to the remainder of the B-52G and B-52H fleet. A provision was made for four GAM-87 Skybolt ballistic missiles. The aircraft's first flight occurred on 10 July 1960, and it entered service on 9 May 1961. This is the only variant still in use by the USAF. A total of 102 B-52Hs were built. The last production aircraft, B-52H AF Serial No. 61-0040, left the factory on 26 October 1962.



!!WARNING: LANDING INSTRUCTIONS!!
Quote
1) Fuel max 30%
2) Align with the track at least 7/8 km;
3) height between 600m and 1 km;
4) Extend all the flaps and lower the throttle;
5) Do not use the joystick, but only the trim to raise or lower the nose of the Aircraft;
6) At the time of the landing keep a speed between 280 and 320km/h;
7) When you are about to touch the ground, do not steer the plane with the control bar but use the trim to land the plane gently, avoiding reaching high angles of attack.

8 ) avoid touching the ground with the plane inclined on a side, try to keep it perfectly on the vertical
9) When touch ground, open the drag chute immeditely;


credits
Quote
Ranwers: all B-52  3d works
Max: Skins
Dreamk: weapons
Western: weapons
Vega: Plane Java & FM.


WARNING!! TO RUN THIS MOD YOU NEED:


JET ERA
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,15649.0.html

COMMON UTILS
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php?topic=40490.0

WEAPONS PACK VER. 1.3
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,48603.0.html

WESTERN WEAPONS PACK GENERATION 2016
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,53426.0.html

SAS Engine MOD western Full-pack
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,52489.0.html

Dreamk ordnance pack
https://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,55355.0.html



Download Link
http://www.mediafire.com/file/70rv3b9d41lpu7n/B-52_V1.0_20180723.rar/file

PATCH 1.1
http://www.mediafire.com/file/p7yoavj36oah7vd/B-52_V1.1_patch_20180817.rar/file



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BlackAce7727

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress by Ranwers - V1.0
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2018, 05:20:37 AM »

One word....WOW.......
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JG13~Jäger

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress by Ranwers - V1.0
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2018, 05:25:48 AM »

Wonerful aircraft i'll wait for Steven 197106 video on it  :P
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Plus facile a dire qu'a faire

KingTiger503

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress by Ranwers - V1.0
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2018, 05:26:20 AM »

Good god, The Big Brother has arrive,.
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My Greatest and Best Regards KT503

Toobone

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress by Ranwers - V1.0
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2018, 06:14:01 AM »

Many thanx, full Nam campaigns for 1961-1975 possible now.
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4S_Vega

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress by Ranwers - V1.0
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2018, 06:30:51 AM »

Link suspended

Will be restored later in the day.
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Gaston

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress by Ranwers - V1.0
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2018, 07:35:08 AM »

Thanks, Vega.

Am waiting for the new link (first download causes a CTD at 20 % loading the game in JTW/BAT, but unnecessary to discuss this for the moment, as a new version is coming).
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Hans-Joachim Marseille

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress by Ranwers - V1.0
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2018, 08:55:08 AM »

For I will never be able to fly this awesome bird could someone pls make a small vid of it!? Thx! You guys are awesome! Looking forward to the Me-264 as well. ;)
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max_thehitman

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress by Ranwers - V1.0
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2018, 10:04:52 AM »

4S_Vega I will send to you the final default skins for ALL B-52 versions.
I thought you were only going to make this post later in the week and not today.

CHECK YOUR PM mails, I sent them to you yesterday  ;)

Cheers
MAX


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Everything I like is either illegal, immoral or fattening ! Welcome to SAS1946

Adamo

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress by Ranwers - V1.0
« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2018, 10:33:00 AM »

This looks fantastic. Will be looking forward to the new link when it's available. ;D

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4S_Vega

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress by Ranwers - V1.0
« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2018, 10:34:47 AM »

4S_Vega I will send to you the final default skins for ALL B-52 versions.
I thought you were only going to make trhis post later in the week and not today.

CHECK YOUR PM mails, I sent them to you yesterday  ;)

Cheers
MAX

Yes, first released version already have skins you sent me via PM.

Link is suspended due other issues, but soon will be fixed.
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Fresco23

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Re: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress by Ranwers - V1.0
« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2018, 12:26:41 PM »

Time for some rollingthunder
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cogito, ergo sum armatus
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