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Author Topic: Boeing B-47 Stratojet by Gio963tto - V1.0 20180623  (Read 4192 times)

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4S_Vega

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Boeing B-47 Stratojet by Gio963tto - V1.0 20180623
« on: June 23, 2018, 06:56:22 AM »

Boeing B-47 Stratojet by Gio

air.ini
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B-47E air.B_47E 1 NOINFO  usa01 SUMMER
B-47EL air.B_47EL 1 NOINFO  usa01 SUMMER
RB-47E air.RB_47E 1 NOINFO  usa01 SUMMER
RB-47H air.RB_47H 1 NOINFO  usa01 SUMMER

plane
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B-47E      Boeing B-47E Stratojet, 1951
B-47EL      Boeing B-47E (IV) Stratojet, 1956
RB-47E      Boeing RB-47E Stratojet, 1955
RB-47H      Boeing RB-47H Stratojet, 1958


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B-47

XB-47, which looked unlike any contemporary bomber, was described by some observers as a "sleek, beautiful outcome that was highly advanced". The 35-degree swept wings were shoulder-mounted, with the twin inboard turbojet engines mounted in neat pods, and the outboard engines tacked under the wings short of the wingtips. With the exception of a change from the shoulder wing configuration to being under the fuselage and cockpit seating to side-by-side, most future airliners would use a similar configuration, with the engines mounted in underwing pylons. This arrangement would reduce the bending moment at the wing roots, saving structural weight. The mass of the engines also acted as counter-flutter weights.
The wing airfoil was identified by Boeing as the BAC 145, but this was actually the NACA 64A(.225)12 mod airfoil. The wing's flexibility was a concern, as it could flex as much as 17.5 ft (5.3 m) at the tip, and major effort was expended to ensure that flight control could be maintained as the wing moved up and down. As it turned out, most of the worries proved unfounded. The aircraft's maximum speed was limited to 425 kn (787 km/h) to avoid control reversal, where aileron inputs by the pilot would cause the wings to twist and produce a roll in the opposite direction to that desired by the pilot. The wings were fitted with a set of Fowler flaps that extended well behind the wing, to enhance lift at slow speeds.
The XB-47 was designed to carry a crew of three in a pressurized forward compartment: a pilot and copilot, in tandem, in a long fighter-style bubble canopy, and a navigator/bombardier in a compartment in the nose. The copilot doubled as tail gunner (using a remotely controlled, radar-directed tail gun), and the navigator as bombardier. The bubble canopy could pitch up and slide backward, but as the cockpit was high off the ground, crew entrance was through a door and ladder on the underside of the nose. The extreme front of the nose was initially glazed to allow visual navigation and bomb sighting, but this was quickly and increasingly faired over with metal. Almost all production versions had a solid metal nose with no windows. A K-series bombsight provided integrated radar navigation and visual navigation, with the optical portion extending through the nose of the aircraft in a small dome.
The first prototypes were fitted with General Electric J35 turbojets, the production version of the TG-180, with 3,970 lbf (17.7 kN) of thrust. Early jet engines did not develop good thrust at low speeds, so to help a heavily loaded bomber take off, the XB-47 prototype had provisions for fitting 18 solid-fuel rocket-assisted takeoff (RATO) rockets with 1,000 lbf (4.4 kN) of static thrust each. Fittings for nine such units were built into each side of the rear fuselage, arranged in three rows of three bottles.
The performance of the Model 450 design was projected to be so good that the bomber would be as fast as fighters then on the drawing board, and so the only defensive armament was to be a tail turret with two .50 in (12.7 mm) AN/M2 Browning machine guns, which would in principle be directed by an automatic fire-control system. The two XB-47s were not fitted with the tail turrets as they were engineering and flight test aircraft; indeed, the prototypes had no combat equipment at all.
The one problem with this early design was that at higher altitudes where the pure turbojet engines could produce decent fuel economy, the wing was very compromised. At the top of the B-47's envelope, about 35,000 feet (11,000 m), the B-47 was in "coffin corner". That means that at this level, which produced the most range at most weights due to fuel consumption, there was an envelope of 5 kn (9.3 km/h) between maximum mach and stall speed. Since this airplane had a rudimentary autopilot at best, it meant that if the B-47 was going to cross the Atlantic Ocean, it had to be flown this high and the pilot had to leave the autopilot turned off and spend up to eight hours staring at the airspeed and manipulating the throttles in order to not crash. To put this in perspective, a modern Boeing 757 has over 50 kn (93 km/h) of difference at even a very heavy weight at 41,000 feet (12,000 m). Fuel capacity was enormous, at 17,000 US gal (64,000 l), more than triple the 5,000 US gal (19,000 l) on the B-29 Superfortress. That meant that maintaining fuel trim to ensure a stable center of gravity in flight would be a very critical copilot duty. The total bombload capacity was to be 25,000 lb (11 t). Production aircraft were to be equipped with modern electronics for navigation, bombing, countermeasures and turret fire control.

An XB-47 was flown in the 1951 Operation Greenhouse nuclear weapons testing. This was followed by a B-47B being flown in the 1952 Operation Ivy and the 1954 Operation Castle. A B-47E was then flown in the 1956 Operation Redwing.
Three B-47s flew cross country from March Air Force Base to the Philadelphia International Airport as participants in the 1955 Labor Day race. In the 1956 event, three B-47s participated in the G.E. Trophy race for Jet Bombers, flying from Kindley Field, Bermuda, to Oklahoma City. One of these set a course speed record of 601.187 MPH.
By 1956, the U.S. Air Force had 28 wings of B-47 bombers and five wings of RB-47 reconnaissance aircraft. The bombers were the first line of America's strategic nuclear deterrent, often operating from forward bases in the UK, Morocco, Spain, Alaska, Greenland and Guam. B-47s were often set up on "one-third" alert, with a third of the operational aircraft available sitting on hardstands or an alert ramp adjacent to the runway, loaded with fuel and nuclear weapons, crews on standby, ready to attack the USSR at short notice.
Crews were also trained to perform "Minimum Interval Take Offs (MITO)" with one bomber following the other into the air at intervals of as little as 15 seconds, to launch all bombers as fast as possible. MITO could be hazardous, as the bombers left wing tip vortices and general turbulence behind them, and with first generation turbojet engines with water-injection systems, they also created dense black smoke.
The B-47 was the backbone of SAC into 1959, when the B-52 began to assume nuclear alert duties and the number of B-47 bomber wings started to be reduced. B-47 production ceased in 1957, though modifications and rebuilds continued after that.
Operational practice for B-47 bomber operations during this time went from high altitude bombing to low altitude strike, which was judged more likely to penetrate Soviet defenses. Bomber crews were trained in "pop-up" attacks, coming in at low level at 425 knots (787 km/h) and then climbing abruptly near the target before releasing a nuclear weapon.
Stress and fatigue incurred in low-altitude operations led to a number of wing failures and crashes, and an extensive refit program was begun in 1958 to strengthen the wing mountings. The program was known as "Milk Bottle", named after the big connecting pins that were replaced in the wing roots.
One of the more notable mishaps involving a B-47 occurred on 5 February 1958 near Savannah, Georgia, in the so-called 1958 Tybee Island B-47 crash. A B-47 based out of Homestead AFB, Florida, was engaged in a simulated combat exercise against an F-86 fighter. As was the practice at the time, the B-47 was carrying a single 7,600 lb (3,400 kg) Mark 15 nuclear bomb, without its core.[30] During this exercise, the F-86 collided with the B-47. The F-86 pilot ejected and the fighter crashed; the B-47 suffered substantial damage, including loss of power in one outboard jet engine. After three unsuccessful landing attempts at Hunter Air Force Base, the bomber pilot had to "safe" soft drop the Mark 15 weapon off the coast of Savannah, Georgia near Tybee Island. The bomb was jettisoned and the aircraft landed safely. An extensive nine-month search was mounted for the unarmed bomb, but proved futile.
In 1963 the Kennedy administration offered 24 B-47E bombers as an interim Canberra Mk 20 replacement for Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), pending delivery of the much delayed F-111C aircraft. Three B-47E aircraft flew to Australia for demonstration purposes but RAAF declined the offer as technically outdated and too resource-intensive.
Final phaseout of B-47 bomber wings began in 1963, and the last bombers were out of service with SAC by 1966. The last USAF operational aircraft, WB-47Es assigned to the Air Weather Service, were withdrawn from use in September 1969. Shortly before, a B-47E number 53-2280 was used as a testbed for crucial early test of the newly developed fly-by-wire system.
The U.S. Navy kept specialized EB-47E test aircraft bailed from USAF inventory in occasional use in support of the Fleet Electronic Warfare Systems Group (FEWSG) until December 1977 when they were replaced by government owned/contractor operated (GOCO) NKC-135 Stratotanker aircraft also loaned from USAF inventory.
The final recorded flight of a B-47 was on 17 June 1986, when a B-47E was restored to flight-worthy condition for a one-time ferry flight. This aircraft was flown from Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, California, to Castle Air Force Base, California, for static display at the Castle Air Museum, where it presently resides.

The only B-47s to see anything that resembled combat were the aerial reconnaissance variants. The first overflight of Soviet territory with a B-47B, equipped "with special radar and photographic cameras installed in the bomb bay," took place on 15 October 1952, when one flying out of Alaska overflew Soviet airfields in Northeastern Siberia. RB-47s operated from almost every airfield that gave them access to the USSR, and they often probed Soviet airspace. On occasion, their pilots were caught in situations from which they escaped mostly through speed and evasion. At least five of these aircraft were fired on, and three were shot down. The RB-47s fired back with their tail turrets, although it is uncertain if they scored any kills; these were the only shots fired in anger by any B-47.

On 8 May 1954, after a top secret reconnaissance mission in the Kola Peninsula, a 4th Air Division 91 Strategic Reconnaissance Wing RB-47E reconnaissance aircraft, with Harold Austin at the controls, flew over the Soviet Union. The RB-47E was flying at high altitude, out of reach of MiG-15s, but unknown to USAF intelligence some MiG-17s had been stationed in the area that were able to intercept the intruder. The RB-47E was chased by several Soviet MiG-17 fighters attempting to destroy the aircraft with their guns over Soviet and Finnish airspace. Although sustaining damage, the RB-47E managed to escape over Sweden back to its home base at RAF Fairford, Gloucestershire. Its top speed and combat radius superiority to the Soviet fighter jets were the deciding factors. The mission marked the first time a jet aircraft equipped with modern aerial photography equipment, K-17 and K-38 cameras, was used for American military reconnaissance over the Soviet Union. The incident was kept secret by all parties.

Other interceptions resulted in losses. An RB-47 flying out of Alaska was scouting out the Kamchatka Peninsula on 17 April 1955, when it was intercepted by Soviet MiG-15s in international airspace. The RB-47 and its crew disappeared. Between 21 March and 10 May 1956, 16 RB-47Es and five RB-47Hs operating from Thule performed overflights the length of Siberia 156 times under Project HOMERUN. The Soviets filed an angry complaint with the U.S. government, which attributed the overflights to "navigational difficulties". MiGs intercepted RB-47s on three separate occasions in the fall of 1958: over the Black Sea on 31 October, over the Baltic on 7 November, and over the Sea of Japan on 17 November.
On 1 July 1960, a PVO Strany MiG-19 shot down an RB-47H (AF Serial No. 53-4281) reconnaissance aircraft in the international airspace over the Barents Sea with four of the crew being killed and two captured by the Soviets, but released in 1961. The co-pilot reported that the MiG-19 jammed ("whited-out") his MD-4 FCS scope (the radar which aimed the tail guns), rendering the RB-47H defenseless. The last known confrontation between MiGs and RB-47s took place on 28 April 1965, when an ERB-47H was intercepted by two North Korean MiG-17s over the Sea of Japan. The MiGs scored hits on the aircraft, but the ERB-47H managed to make it back to Yokota Air Base in Japan with three engines out.
While a few of these aircraft performed special duties during the Vietnam War, such as relaying ELINT data from drones, they were eventually replaced by much more efficient and capable Boeing RC-135 platforms. The last RB-47H was retired on 29 December 1967.
The final 15 RB-47s, built beginning in December 1955, were fitted with additional equipment, including the AN/APD "side looking airborne radar" (SLAR) system, and gear to sample the air for fallout from nuclear tests. These models were given the new designation RB-47K. These were generally used for weather reconnaissance missions, carrying a load of eight "dropsonde" weather sensors that were released at various checkpoints along the aircraft's flight path. Data radioed back from the dropsondes was logged using equipment operated by the navigator. The RB-47Ks stayed in service until 1963.

B-47E
The designations B-47C and B-47D were applied to special variants that never went into production, and so the production version of the B-47 was the definitive B-47E.
The first B-47E flew on 30 January 1953. Four "blocks" or "phases" of the B-47E were built, each incorporating refinements on the previous block, and also sometimes featuring production changes within a block. Older blocks were generally brought up to the specifications of later blocks as they were introduced. The B-47 also incorporated the production model with the radar controlled rear tail turret.Early production "B-47E-Is" also known featured J47-GE-25 turbojets with 5,970 lbf (26.6 kN) thrust, but they were quickly changed to J47-GE-25A engines, which featured a significant improvement in the form of water-methanol injection. This was a scheme in which a water-methanol mix was dumped into the engines at takeoff, increasing mass flow and so temporarily kicking the thrust up to 7,200 lbf (32 kN). Methanol was apparently added to the water as an anti-freezing agent. The engines left a trail of black smoke behind them when water-methanol injection was on.Jet-Assisted Take Off or JATO modifications were performed on early B-47E-Is. They had the 18 built-in JATO bottles, and were quickly exchanged for an external, jettisonable "split V" or "horse collar" rack fitted under the rear fuselage. The rack carried 33 JATO bottles, in three rows of 11 bottles. The built-in JATO system was eliminated because of worries about having the JATO bottles so close to full fuel tanks, and in any case once the rocket bottles were exhausted they were just dead weight. The racks were expendable, and were dropped over specific range areas after takeoff.

The internal fuel capacity of initial production B-47Es was cut to 14,627 US gal (55,370 l) as a weight-saving measure. This was considered acceptable because of the use of the big external tanks and the fact that the USAF had refined mid-air refueling to the point where it could be relied upon as a standard practice.One welcome change in the B-47E relative to the B-47B was the return of the ejection seats, the Air Force senior leadership having reconsidered the earlier decision to delete them. In addition, the twin .50 in guns (12.7 mm) in the tail turret were replaced with twin 20 mm (0.79 in) cannon to provide more firepower, backed up by an A-5 FCS in early production and an MD-4 FCS in later production. A final change in the B-47E was that most of the windows in the nose were deleted, with only one left on each side. However, many pictures of B-47Es show them with the full set of windows used on the B-47B. Whether the number of windows varied through B-47E production, or whether these were B-47Bs updated to B-47E specification, is unclear.The B-47E-II featured only minor changes from late production B-47E-Is. The B-47E-III featured an ECM suite, consisting of a radar jammer in a bulge under the fuselage plus a chaff dispenser, as well as improved electrical alternators.The B-47E-IV was a much more substantial update, featuring stronger landing gear, airframe reinforcement, greater fuel capacity, and a bombload uprated to 25,000 lb (11,300 kg), though the bomb bay was once again shortened because of the introduction of more compact nuclear weapons.Another improvement was the introduction of the MA-7A BNS, a major step up from its predecessors. The MA-7A included the AN/APS-64 radar, with a range as long as 240 mi (390 km). The AN/APS-64 could be used as a long range "identification friend or foe (IFF) transponder" interrogator to allow a B-47E-IV to find a tanker or other B-47, or it could be used as a high-resolution ground-targeting radar. The B-47E-IV retained the optical bombsight, though this was rarely used.A total of 1,341 B-47Es were produced. A total of 691 were built by Boeing, 386 were built by Lockheed, and 264 were built by Douglas. Most B-47Bs were rebuilt up to B-47E standards. They were given the designation of B-47B-II, though it appears that in practice they were simply called B-47Es.



RB-47E

The B-47E was also the basis for a number of important long-range reconnaissance variants. The only B-47s to see anything that resembled combat were these reconnaissance variants. They operated from almost every airfield that gave them access to the USSR, and often probed Soviet airspace.Boeing-Wichita built 240 RB-47E reconnaissance variants, similar to the B-47E but with a nose stretched by 34 in (0.86 m), giving them an arguably more elegant appearance than the bomber variants of the B-47. The long nose was used to stow up to 11 cameras, which could include:An O-15 radar camera for low-altitude work.
A forward oblique camera for low-altitude work.
A K-17 trimetrogon (three-angle) camera for panoramic shots.
K-36 telescopic cameras.
The RB-47E could carry photoflash flares for night reconnaissance. Although the RB-47E could be refueled in flight, its fuel capacity was increased, to a total of 18,400 US gal (70,000 l). The navigator controlled the cameras, becoming a "navigator-photographer" instead of a "navigator-bombardier".WB-47E


RB-47H

A total of 32 RB-47H models were built for the electronic intelligence (ELINT) mission, as well as three more specialized "ERB-47Hs". These aircraft featured distinctive blunt, rounded nose and sported blisters and pods for intelligence-gathering antennas and gear. They were designed to probe adversary defenses and then collect data on radar and defense communications signals.The bomb bay was replaced by a pressurized compartment, which accommodated "Crows", or Electronic Warfare Officers. There were three Crows on board the RB-47H, but only two on the ERB-47H. A distinctive bulged radome fairing replaced the bomb bay doors. The RB-47H / ERB-47H retained the tail turret, and were also fitted with jammers and chaff dispensers. The only easily recognizable difference in appearance between the RB-47H and ERB-47H was that the ERB-47H had a small but distinctive antenna fairing under the rounded nose.The first RB-47H was delivered in August 1955 to Forbes AFB, Kansas. The ELINT B-47s proved so valuable that they were put through a "Mod 44" or "Silver King" update program in 1961 to provide them with updated electronics systems. Silver King aircraft could be easily recognized by a large teardrop pod for ELINT antennas attached to a pylon, mounted under the belly and offset to one side of the aircraft, as well as a pylon-style antenna attached under each wing beyond the outboard engine.

It is unclear if all RB-47Hs and ERB-47Hs were updated to the Silver King specification.The RB-47H and ERB-47H were highly capable aircraft, but the EWO compartment was not only cramped with sitting room only, but also had both poor noise insulation and climate control. This made 12-hour missions very uncomfortable and tiring, and some sources say that the Crows even had to deal with fuel leaks on occasion. Successful ejection downward (cutting through the belly radome) was impossible on-or-near the ground. Crows sat bobsled-like on the pilot compartment access floor for takeoff and landing; having to crawl encumbered with Arctic clothing with parachute to-from their compartment along an unpressurized maintenance shelf during temporary level-off at 10,000 ft (3,000 m).
Operations of the RB-47H and ERB-47H were often classified Top Secret, with the ten-hour missions generally flown at night. When crews were asked what they were doing, they always answered that such information was classified. On inquiries on what the blunt black nose was for, they would sometimes reply that it was a bumper, used in in-flight refueling in case they nosed into the tanker. This reply was often believed.The final RB-47H to be retired from service, 53-4296, was later pulled out of the "boneyard" and used for tests of avionics for the General Dynamics FB-111. This RB-47H was fitted with an F-111-style nose and flew into the early 1970s. It was not given any special designation. It is now on display at the Air Force Armament Museum at Eglin Air Force Base, fitted with a bomber nose.


!!WARNING: LANDING INSTRUCTIONS!!
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1) Fuel max 30%
2) Align with the track at least 7/8 km;
3) height between 600m and 1 km;
4) Extend all the flaps and lower the throttle;
5) Do not use the joystick, but only the trim to raise or lower the nose of the Aircraft;
6) At the time of the landing keep a speed between 280 and 320km/h;
7) When you are about to touch the ground, do not steer the plane with the control bar but use the trim to land the plane gently, avoiding reaching high angles of attack.

8 ) avoid touching the ground with the plane inclined on a side, try to keep it perfectly on the vertical
9) When touch ground, open the drag chute immeditely;

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Pay attention to the take-off weight, the aircraft needs a greater take-off run than all runway here in IL2.
You can take off from the longest airfields using the configurations with the JATO booster pack. Or you can take off with low fuel, a new KC-97 tanker is being prepared!


credits
Quote
Gio963tto: all 3d works
Western: weapons
Dreamk: weapons
mm: B-47 skins
Vega: Plane Java & FM.


WARNING!! TO RUN THIS MOD YOU NEED:


JET ERA
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,15649.0.html

COMMON UTILS
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php?topic=40490.0

WEAPONS PACK VER. 1.3
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,48603.0.html

WESTERN WEAPONS PACK GENERATION 2016
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,53426.0.html

SAS Engine MOD western Full-pack
http://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,52489.0.html

Dreamk ordnance pack
https://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,55355.0.html

F-84 pack
https://www.sas1946.com/main/index.php/topic,53064.0.html



Download Link B-47
http://www.mediafire.com/file/j99833si1fkq443/B-47_V1.0_20180623.rar/file


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Hubberranz

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Re: Boeing B-47 Stratojet by Gio963tto - V1.0 20180623
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2018, 07:04:06 AM »

Oooooooooh.            Testing it right away!  ;D
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Gerri57

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Re: Boeing B-47 Stratojet by Gio963tto - V1.0 20180623
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2018, 08:05:57 AM »

thx, Very good job!,But I'havent cockpit and skin:(
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4S_Vega

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Re: Boeing B-47 Stratojet by Gio963tto - V1.0 20180623
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2018, 08:18:28 AM »

thx, Very good job!,But I'havent cockpit and skin:(

You need the F-84 pack for pit
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ggrewe

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Re: Boeing B-47 Stratojet by Gio963tto - V1.0 20180623
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2018, 08:25:48 AM »

Great work, love these big birds - thanks to all involved Gio, Vega, Western, Dreamk & mm for skins  8)
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Seb

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Re: Boeing B-47 Stratojet by Gio963tto - V1.0 20180623
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2018, 09:05:39 AM »

Hi, Gio and Vega
Thank you for this plane.
I apologize for the confusion, you also need the F-4 Phantom II installed so that the parachute will work well.
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Geschirrsp├╝lmaschine19

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Re: Boeing B-47 Stratojet by Gio963tto - V1.0 20180623
« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2018, 10:00:39 AM »

WOW!!! Looks amazing!!! I love these Cold War bombers.
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"If we don't know what we're doing, neither will the enemy."

TeamFlyingAce162

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Re: Boeing B-47 Stratojet by Gio963tto - V1.0 20180623
« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2018, 10:12:15 AM »



The Tupolevs' got an opponent:

Thanks to all who've got this baby-BUFF flying. Keep up the great work!
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VasyafromBelarus

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Re: Boeing B-47 Stratojet by Gio963tto - V1.0 20180623
« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2018, 10:41:12 AM »

I haven't cockpit, but I have F-84 pack. In logfile I found this:

[15:49:10]   INTERNAL ERROR: HierMesh: Can't find chunk 'GearL6_D0'
[15:49:10]   INTERNAL ERROR: HierMesh: Can't find chunk 'GearR6_D0'
[15:49:10]   INTERNAL ERROR: Can't open file '3DO/Cockpit/B-29/hierBombardier, him'
[15:49:10]   WARNING: object '3DO/Cockpit/B-29/hierBombardier,him' of class 'HIM' not loaded
[15:49:10]   INTERNAL ERROR: HierMeshObj: Can't load HIM 3DO/Cockpit/B-29/hierBombardier, him
[15:49:10]   INTERNAL ERROR: HierMeshObj: Can't load HIM 3DO/Cockpit/B-29/hierBombardier, him
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4S_Vega

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Re: Boeing B-47 Stratojet by Gio963tto - V1.0 20180623
« Reply #9 on: June 23, 2018, 11:43:50 AM »

Try to install a B-29 folder in your game
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KingTiger503

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Re: Boeing B-47 Stratojet by Gio963tto - V1.0 20180623
« Reply #10 on: June 23, 2018, 11:49:40 AM »

Well done vega,
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My Greatest and Best Regards KT503

western0221

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Re: Boeing B-47 Stratojet by Gio963tto - V1.0 20180623
« Reply #11 on: June 23, 2018, 11:49:57 AM »

Try to install a B-29 folder in your game

Not tested this mod yet,
but heard like only enabling SAS AI Flyables by JSGME.
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