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Author Topic: US modern ammunition paint rules, to avoid buggy textures  (Read 1437 times)

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western0221

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US modern ammunition paint rules, to avoid buggy textures
« on: November 14, 2017, 05:51:11 PM »

Hi.

I found some mod US modern ammunition are painted in "Not Live" --- but "only for training" styles.

Air Force bases often display training ammunition in their open festival. So many taken photos found on web (and sometimes published books) of displayed missiles / bombs are training ammunition .... not Live ammunition used in actual war.


About US Air Force and Navy / Marine Corps, Yellow line means Live Explosive, Brown line means Live rocket motor.
Blue line or fully painted in blue means training. Some of them are completely dummy only for ground crew operation training. Others have a working seeker or fuze sending electronic signals to carrier's FCS for pilot training.

Mk82 bomb with yellow lines (Live):


Mk82 bomb with a blue line and another painted in blue (training):



AIM-120 missile with yellow and brown lines (Live):

AIM-120 missile with blue lines (training):


When the bomb or missile are painted in checker flag patterns with black and white / yellow and red, they mean trials in developing. Those paints make easy to check flight status in visuals.
Or some flight recorders are also painted in checker patterns.

JASDF ASM-2 (Type93 Air-to-Ship missile) painted in red - yellow checker:



In the other side, when the web site shows correct designation code as a caption of the photo, it may help you to decide the photo shows training ammunition or live one.
US uses "X-" prefix for Prototype, "Y-" prefix for Training.
So "YAIM-120A" means AIM-120A's training version. You can decide the photo doesn't show Live missile style.

 ~~~~~ ~~~~~ ~~~~~

Local exceptions.


JASDF paints their Live ASM-2 in blue as ocean camouflage.

JASDF ASM-2 (probably Live) painted in ocean blue camo:

Its carrier jet F-2 's pylons are painted in the same color.
Whole of F-2 is also painted in ocean blue camo:



Swedish Air Force often paint their AAMs (AIM-4 and AIM-9 variants) and unguided rockets, bombs in green.
I don't know they are only display models or live ammunition as forest camouflage.

Rb 28 AAM (AIM-4C variants):


SAAB J-37 Viggen and green bombs / rockets / missiles:


 ~~~~~ ~~~~~ ~~~~~

Some buggy textures I found are fixed in my latest Weapon pack Generation2016-ii.
When you'll find another bug texture in my pack, tell me. I can fix it in the next update.
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Dreamk

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Re: US modern ammunition paint rules, to avoid buggy textures
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2017, 01:07:33 AM »

Current NATO aviation ordnance markings regulations:
All munitions used by NATO members have markings applied to them to allow quick identification. This allows correct handling of the ordnance and also allows prompt decisions to be made if an accident such as an aircraft fire occurs. By using a standardised set of colours for markings there is no requirement for a common language, allowing armed forces from different countries to work safely together. It also allows identification from a distance..

The dark green (Deep Bronze Green No 224) colour of a bomb's warhead is a non-significant colour meaning it doesn’t indicate anything. It is the lack of a significant colour i.e. Oxford Blue tells you it isn’t an inert weapon.

The yellow ring (Golden Yellow No 356) indicated the presence of high explosive ( i.e. a live warhead).

The blue (Deep Saxe Blue No 113) rings around a weapon and the lack of any other identification colours indicates that this weapon contains no explosives. This indentifies the round as a training round used for training or firing practice in place of the combat equivalent.

The blue (Deep Saxe Blue No 113) colour of the warhead on a bomb indicates it is a practice bomb. The high explosive is replaced with concrete to give the round the correct weight. These aren’t dropped and are used to give the pilot the same experience as flying with live ordnance. However concrete training rounds may be used to limit collateral damage compared to the used of the High Explosive version.

The white colour of the body of a missile is a non-significant colour meaning it doesn’t indicate anything.

The blue (Deep Saxe Blue No 113) ring around a missile indicates this is a training missile and does not contain a live rocket motor.

The brown ring (Middle Brown No 411) around a missile body indicates the presence of low explosive i.e. a live rocket motor.

The pink ring (Shell Pink No 453) around a missile's warhead indicates the presence of live seeker head used in acquisition training.

The orange (International Orange No 592) and black markings in the centre of the body and at the tail end of a missile indicate an evaluation version of the guided missile. These colours are used when photographic records are required and allow easy identification of if the missile is rotating around its axis.

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Dreamk

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Re: US modern ammunition paint rules, to avoid buggy textures
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2017, 01:37:27 AM »

US bombs colors and stripes post 1957 till present day

Olive Drab FS34087 bomb body, etc, varies often in shade from one batch to another
Some parts of modern bombs use both Olive Drab (FS34088) and Dark Grey Green FS34095 for different parts
Light Ghost Grey FS36375 has also been introduced in the 1990s for bombs and some guidance pods

Silver/Aluminum FS17178 Countermeasures
Medium Ship Gray FS36118 is often used on modern guidance pods

Yellow FS33538 High Explosive nose stripes on bombs, missile warheads, etc

Red-Brown FS30117 Low Explosive, denotes rocket motors on rockets and missiles
Dark Gull Gray FS36231 Chemical weapons bodies, a different gray than the "modern bomb color gray"
Red FS31136 Irritant agent, such as tear gas, etc

Dark Green FS24108 Toxic Agent,nerve gas, etc the bomb body is the Dk Gull Gray, the stripes are Green for Toxic, or Red for Irritants, with different numbers of stripes for each specific chemical in each group

Black FS37038 Armor piercing, uncommon since the sixties

Light Green FS34449 Smoke or Marker (some stores would get the Light Red, instead, if incendiary)

Light Red FS31158 Incendiary or Highly Flammable,,Napalm

White FS37875,Illuminating

Light Blue FS35109 Training

Orange FS32246 Training/Tracking, this is the "other" Orange named International Orange, it is much "oranger" than the Redish tinted International Orange FS12197 - both were in use during the same years

Bombs stripes evolution:
Since the 1950s, US bombs sported one Yellow FS33538 stripe at the nose area, the location could and did vary, it wasn't always right on the nose behind the fuze

Carrier fires incidents during the Vietnam conflict, brought the introduction in 1971 of the Ablative coating, increasing the length time of bombs resistance to fire.
These Ablative Coating bombs got Two of the Yellow stripes, spaced the same distance apart as one stripe width.

Another stripe was added in more modern times to denote a bomb filled with a certain explosive filler - for example, the Thermally Protected BLU-111A/B, which is a bomb (1st stripe) with Thermal Protection (2nd stripe), filled with PBXN-109 Explosive Filler (3rd stripe), with a FS36375 Light Ghost Gray body
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western0221

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Re: US modern ammunition paint rules, to avoid buggy textures
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2017, 05:07:10 AM »

Not US, Not NATO, but I find a good sample photo.



Here is a Russia / India new cruise missile BrahMos-A.
Launching trial from Su-30.

So, Russia / India also paint trial missiles in black and white checker flag like easy to check flight status in visual.
When you'll see such painted missiles or guided bombs, you can decide they are under trials before deployment, the paint will not fit for actual corps in IL-2 1946.
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western0221

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Re: US modern ammunition paint rules, to avoid buggy textures
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2018, 05:01:06 PM »

Some ammunition photos taken in air force bases are with some safety caps / covers about missile seaker, rocket nozzle, fuze.
Those caps / covers are painted in yellow or red.

Not to model / paint those caps or covers as actual live ammunition carried by flying airplanes.
(When you want to make ground stored models or scenes of being moved by ground crews, those safety tools will make a realistic diorama.)
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