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Author Topic: Krasnyi Vostock - Orient is Red  (Read 11382 times)

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Alfie Noakes

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Re: Krasnyi Vostock - Orient is Red
« Reply #36 on: March 15, 2016, 02:05:44 AM »

Many thanks Dreamk for this explanation of "blipping"  ;D
I had no idea the process was this complex.......

I thought the process was

1. Make an approach to the airfield
2. Cut ignition to a third of the cylinders....reduce speed/altitude
3. Cut ignition to another third of cylinders.....minimum speed/ 30m ish altitude
4. Land
5. Cut ign on all cylinders

OR

1. Make an approach to the airfield
2.Cut ign to all cylinders
3.Reduce speed so a/c is just about to fall out of sky
4. Hit Blipp Switch...fire all cylinders
5.Ascend slightly...reduce speed
6.Repeat until just off the ground with minimum speed
7. Land
8. Cut ign to all cylinders.

From your description it sounds a bit like the process of "double de-clutching" that you did to change gear on pre 1940's cars !

Also

Quote
Blipping consisted in modifying the ignition sequence   

Any idea how this was done ?  ( reducing the strength of the spark?.....sending reduced spark to selected cylinders?) and what was the result?..

Also

Quote
In Il2 all this can be done rather straightforward 

Crikey...are you suggesting that all the rotary engines in THE GAME can be set like this ?
That seems like an awful lot of work for you  o_O

Anyway, many thanks for your continued contribution...to the best WW I flight sim ever   :D

Cheers

Alfie
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Dreamk

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Re: Krasnyi Vostock - Orient is Red
« Reply #37 on: March 15, 2016, 07:40:56 AM »

Quote
Any idea how this was done ?

Blipping was  actually achieved by firing all the cylinders, but only after a set number of revolutions of the engine (depending on the switch position).

The normal sequence of cylinders ignition for 7cyl rotaries (such as the Gnome 50 and 80HP) was 1-3-5-7-2-4-6. For 9 cylinders rotaries (such as the Gnome Monosoupape 100HP, Le Rhone 9C 80HP and 9J 110HP) the sequence was 1-3-5-7-9-2-4-6-8 (On the first revolution 1-3-5-7-9, then on the second revolution 2-4-6-8).

On the 100HP monosoupape, the blip caused each cylinder to be fired only once per three engine revolutions but the engine remained in perfect balance.

The 160hp Gnome 9N offered more possibilities. It had a dual option in regards to its blip switch. Depending of which magneto you were running off of. With the selection of one magneto you were either full power or off, while the selection of the second magneto gave the pilot a choice of 1/2, 1/4 , 1/8 power or off.

You could be set to fire all 9, 7, 5, or just 3 cylinders on each revolution. The cylinders that were not firing still cycled, but had no spark. They filled with fuel/oil and then expelled it, unburnt, into the cowl.
There were five positions on the switch: 4-3-2-1-0, 4 being full power.
Normal firing order (9 cylinders rotary) was: 1-3-5-7-9-2-4-6-8, meaning two revolutions of the engine to fire all plugs, 0 being off.
On switch position 3 every other ignition pulse was skipped, so the firing order was 1-5-9-4-8-3-7-2-6 and it took four revolutions instead or two for all cylinders to fire, meaning half speed.
On position 2 it took eight revolutions to fire all cylinders, 1 (skip 3-5-7)-9 (skip 2-4-6)-8, and so on, meaning 1/4 speed.
On position 1 it brought 1/8 speed, taking 16 revolutions to complete the firing order

You had to be careful, because blipping too long would "strangle" the engine, and an airborne restart of the engine was not always possible. As well you would not blip it too long in the air while the propeller was turning the engine under influence of the air flow, because, if the cylinders would be flooded too long without firing, a prolonged re-igniting would set the whole engine afire - or the engine would not start again because of wet spark plugs.

Quote
"double de-clutching"
How many times have I heard, as a kid, my father repeat how good it was that cars have no longer need for that! He learned to drive, while he was soldiering in ww2, on an obsolete pre-war British (?) truck that had the steering wheel in the middle, and demanded "double de-clutching" - as in was mainly on mountain roads, it was sometimes quite "an experience and an experiment as well".
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Alfie Noakes

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Re: Krasnyi Vostock - Orient is Red
« Reply #38 on: March 15, 2016, 08:13:23 AM »

 
Quote
  "an experience and an experiment as well".   
 
An experience I know only too well.........minutes of fun  :D :D :D :D
Many thanks for the concise "blipping" info...read and understood...I'm feeling quietly confident now.....ready to give it a go  ;D

Although, not to sure about this bit.....

Quote
  if the cylinders would be flooded too long without firing, a prolonged re-igniting would set the whole engine afire 
  o_O

Cheers

Alfie
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Dreamk

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Re: Krasnyi Vostock - Orient is Red
« Reply #39 on: March 18, 2016, 05:56:59 AM »

This week I have been busy with "plaque pressure" speed indicators: the various Eteve models and the Pensuti.
The Eteve was used by French and Russians - not by the Belgians and apparently not by the British.
The early Eteve was more a stall indicator than a real speed indicator, and was made compuldsory as such on all airplanes of the French Aeronautique Militaire from 1911 onwards to reduce rate of accidents. As a matter of fact the original Eteve model had a sphere instead of the plaque, but very fast a transformation thought of by Renard, one of the two producers of these speed indicators, was introduced to create the definitive model.
Definitive is quite relative as the Russians used a still more complex model, with an articulated armlet and plaque, allowing it to be installed on the aircraft in any position.

The German developed their own speed indicator on the basis of the Eteve, model that apparently saw limited use in 1914 but the pilots preferred by far to use the cup anemometers that were widely available among the German and Austrian air forces. Interestingly the German model would reappear in 1931, in the US, under the name "Johnson Air Speed Indicator"...still in use today on some training planes.

The Pensuti used the same principle but was more complex than the Eteve, beingwidely employed on Italian planes.
 
Here are the originals and their animated models before export to Il2:

The Animated 3d models before their export to Il2:

Red Arrow shows direction of flight, Blue arrow direction of relative wind

1. Early (for Gnome engined planes) and Late (for Le Rhone engined aircarft) Eteve models 

A. On ground



B. at extreme ("critical") speed



2. The Russian Eteve model (for Gnome - there a chronical shortage of Le Rhone in the IRAS while the Rhone was locally license produced)

A. On ground



B. A maximal ("critical") speed



3. the Pensuti




The originals:

The Eteve






Eteve on a Voisin (the rear triangular object is a Lepaute Bombsight)



Modified Eteve in an IRAS flying School



The Pensuti (an early model is shown on the photo of the Caproni, with a larger plaque and a slightly modified body)








The German Stauscheiben Fahrtmesser and the Johnson Air Speed indicator:


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stiv_069

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Re: Krasnyi Vostock - Orient is Red
« Reply #40 on: May 18, 2017, 04:30:15 AM »

When can we wait?

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RealDarko

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Re: Krasnyi Vostock - Orient is Red
« Reply #41 on: May 19, 2017, 12:39:11 PM »

Maybe after this one :D :D

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Alfie Noakes

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Re: Krasnyi Vostock - Orient is Red
« Reply #42 on: June 02, 2017, 12:35:35 AM »

Surely this little beauty might fly first  ;)



Cheers

Alfie
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Dreamk

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Re: Krasnyi Vostock - Orient is Red
« Reply #43 on: June 02, 2017, 04:36:08 AM »

Yes, i'm a little busy and got some PC problems so I have delayed uploading these two ladies - the Ansaldo and the S-11. I'll see whether I can do it in the next hours/days
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RealDarko

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Re: Krasnyi Vostock - Orient is Red
« Reply #44 on: June 02, 2017, 05:30:40 AM »

What's that bird Alfie?

And any chance of seeing the Heinkel 59 soon DreamK?
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Alfie Noakes

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Re: Krasnyi Vostock - Orient is Red
« Reply #45 on: June 03, 2017, 07:33:08 AM »

Sikorsky S-12    :-*

Premier Looper    o_O

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sikorsky_S-12

Cheers

Alfie
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RealDarko

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Re: Krasnyi Vostock - Orient is Red
« Reply #46 on: June 04, 2017, 08:50:26 AM »

Thanks Alfie! Interesting bird, looking forward to fly it.
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fresco23

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Re: Krasnyi Vostock - Orient is Red
« Reply #47 on: June 05, 2017, 03:51:40 PM »

Man i love the early monoplanes!
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