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Author Topic: The ART of Flight  (Read 194256 times)

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purgatorio

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WW1
« Reply #36 on: September 02, 2012, 11:00:42 AM »

Richard C. Carline

A Crashed Fokker at Villers-Bretonneux, France, 1918



Watercolour on paper
340 mm x 432 mm


Quote
the mangled remains of a crashed German Fokker aeroplane in a bomb-damaged landscape amongst several bare tree trunks. Another biplane is visible in the grey cloudy sky above.


Baghdad, 1919



oil on canvas
412 mm x 381 mm

Kemmel Hill Seen from an Aeroplane, 1918



oil on canvas
425 mm x 355 mm


Quote
An aerial view from an aircraft over Kemmel Hill and the surrounding Flanders landscape. The hill itself is in the middle ground, with the top of the hill under artillery bombardment. Before the hill is a small valley that is also under bombardment and has a more battle scarred appearance. Two roads run towards this valley. Aircraft, a balloon and black puffs of anti-aircraft fire are visible in the sky in the distance.


Self Portrait in Uniform, 1918



oil on canvas
457 mm x 349 mm


http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/search?filter%5BmakerString%5D%5B0%5D=%22Carline%2C%20Richard%20C%22&query=
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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #37 on: September 03, 2012, 11:52:14 AM »

J. C. Leyendecker
American Aviator, 1917

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purgatorio

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« Reply #38 on: September 04, 2012, 06:07:24 AM »

Gino Severini (Italian, 1883–1966)
Visual Synthesis of the Idea: "War", 1914


Oil on canvas, 36 1/2 x 28 3/4" (92.7 x 73 cm)

Quote
In August 1914, as World War I broke out, the Futurists planned public demonstrations in support of Italian participation. The group’s aggression plays out in this work, one in Severini’s series of war paintings. Working in Paris (France and Italy were allies) and following the example of French Cubists, who integrated text into their paintings, Severini created an image rife with words and symbols evoking the trappings of modern warfare: the slogans "order of general mobilization" and "effort maximum" (in French) as well as canons, French flags, a propeller, smokestacks, and other signifiers of power. The Futurists were eager to break attachments to the past, and war, they felt, was an opportunity for a historical tabula rasa—a chance to wipe the slate clean then create a new world order.
http://www.moma.org/collection/browse_results.php?object_id=89538


Plastic Synthesis of the Idea of War, 1915


oil on canvas, 60 x 50 cm
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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #39 on: September 04, 2012, 06:43:29 AM »

Kazimir Malevich (Russian, born Ukraine. 1878–1935)

Vil'gel'mova Karusel', 1914 with verse by Vladimir Mayakovsky.



Lithographed poster
14 15/16 x 22 1/16" (38 x 56 cm)



Suprematist Composition: Airplane Flying, 1915



Oil on canvas
22 7/8 x 19" (58.1 x 48.3 cm).



Simultaneous Death in an Airplane and at the Railway, 1913



Lithograph
Sheet 4 7/16 x 6 15/16" (11.2 x 17.7 cm)(irreg.)


http://www.moma.org/collection/artist.php?artist_id=3710
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purgatorio

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« Reply #40 on: September 05, 2012, 03:17:29 AM »

James C. Hare/Colliers Weekly (American, born England. 1856–1946)
Plane Landing Alongside U.S.S. Washington, c. 1912


Gelatin silver print
4 5/8 x 6 3/4" (11.7 x 17.1 cm)
http://www.moma.org/collection/browse_results.php?object_id=58602



Unknown Photographer
Untitled (Abstraction, airplane), c. 1920


Gelatin silver print
2 3/8 x 4 1/8" (6 x 10.4 cm)
http://www.moma.org/collection/browse_results.php?object_id=98147



Alfred Stieglitz (American, 1864–1946)
The Aeroplane, 1910


Photogravure
5 11/16 x 6 7/8" (14.5 x 15.5 cm)
http://www.moma.org/collection/browse_results.php?object_id=51519
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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #41 on: September 05, 2012, 03:19:48 AM »

Otto Dix (German, 1891–1969)
Lens Being Bombed (Lens wird mit Bomben belegt) from The War (Der Krieg), 1924




Etching and drypoint from a portfolio of fifty etching, aquatint and drypoints
11 3/4 x 9 5/8" (29.8 x 24.5 cm)
http://www.moma.org/collection/browse_results.php?object_id=63263
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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #42 on: September 05, 2012, 03:38:10 AM »

Stuart Reid

Lieutenant McNamara: Winning the VC in the Course of a Bombing Raid in the Wadi Hesi, 10 Miles East-North-East of Gaza, Palestine, 20 March 1917,  c.1918–1920


Oil on canvas
71.1 x 91.4 cm



The Ridley Tragedy, c. 1918–1920


Oil on canvas
68.5 x 91.4 cm



Bombing of the Wadi Fara, 20 September 1918, 1918


Oil on panel
101.9 x 100.9 cm



The Bott Incident, c.1918–1920


Oil on canvas
76.2 x 91.4 cm



Deraa: The Arab Welcome to the First Handley Page Machine to Arrive in Palestine, 22 September 1918, 1918


Oil on panel
76.2 x 91.4 cm



The Seward Exploit: Second Lieutenant W. E. L. Seward, MC, at Ramleh, near Jaffa in Palestine, 24 March 1917, c.1918–1920


Oil on canvas
68.5 x 91.4 cm



A Handley Page Aeroplane Bombing Nabulus by Night, c.1918–1920


Oil on canvas
69.8 x 93.9 cm
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purgatorio

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« Reply #43 on: September 07, 2012, 02:05:11 PM »

G. Scaccia
Il Bombardiere “Aquila Romana”, 1916



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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #44 on: September 07, 2012, 02:05:47 PM »

William Orpen
The Non-Commissioned Officer Pilot, Royal Flying Corps: Flight Sergeant W. G. Bennett, 1917


Oil on canvas, 91.4 x 81.2 cm

An Airman: Lieut R T C Hoidge




Lieutenant Arthur Percival Foley Rhys Davids (1897–1917), DSO, MC, 1917


Oil on canvas, 91.4 x 76.2 cm


Major James Byford McCudden (1895–1918), VC, DSO, MC, 1918


http://ichef.bbci.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/images/paintings/iwm/large/iwm_iwm_2979_large.jpg


The Return of a Patrol, 1917


Watercolour on paper
508 x 419 mm


Quote
three Royal Flying Corps pilots in leather flying-helmets, goggles and heavy gloves stand on a runway. Two look out towards the viewer, the third stands in profile. There are more figures and a biplane in the background. There is a dark rain cloud moving across the sky from the left of the composition.


German Planes Visiting Cassel, 1917


Oil on canvas, 76.2 x 63.5 cm


Le Sars. F.E. Crashed, 1917


Pencil, Watercolour on paper
419 x 571 mm


Quote
a crashed FE2 biplane of the Royal Flying Corps in an undulating landscape near Le Sars in northern France. The thin frame towards the rear is still intact, but the small cockpit is slumped forward in the ground, the wing completely broken.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/artists/william-orpen
http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/search?filter%5BmakerString%5D%5B0%5D=%22Orpen%2C%20William%20%20%28Sir%29%20%28RA%29%22&query=
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max_thehitman

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #45 on: September 07, 2012, 02:41:52 PM »



Great artsy posts Purgatorio. Very nice!
I remember seeing those WW1 airplane paintings from a book I bought back in 1980, it was from a book
series from TIME-LIFE called "The Epic of Flight".

I still have this book...  http://www.ebay.com/itm/KNIGHTS-OF-THE-AIR-by-Ezra-Bowen-1980-History-of-Aviation-in-WWI-/310430654927?pt=US_Nonfiction_Book&hash=item48471be1cf

http://www.ebay.com/itm/EPIC-FLIGHT-TIME-LIFE-BOOKS-21-VOL-SET-/280615324051
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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #46 on: September 07, 2012, 03:04:39 PM »

Edward Newling

Captain Albert Ball (1896–1917), VC, DSO, 1921


Oil on canvas, 111.8 x 86.4 cm


Second Lieutenant Gilbert Stuart Martin Insall (1894–1972), VC, MC, Royal Flying Corps and Later Squadron Leader, Royal Air Force, 1919


Oil on canvas, 112.3 x 86.9 cm


Major James Byford McCudden (1895–1918), VC, SO, MC, RFC, 1919


Oil on canvas, 112.3 x 86.9 cm


Contemplating on the portraits of airmen that look so gentle and peaceful, I find it quite difficult not to forget that most of them were not only highly decorated heroes but something else, too. Casualties.


Air Vice-Marshal Sir Sefton Brancker (1877–1930), KCB, AFC


Oil on canvas, 125 x 100 cm


http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/artists/edward-newling
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purgatorio

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« Reply #47 on: September 07, 2012, 04:16:01 PM »

Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson (1889-1946), Part II
Part I LINK

A Taube, 1916


oil on canvas
638 x766 mm


Quote
The body of a small French schoolboy lies on the pavement outside a house. The corpse is surrounded by broken cobblestones from a hole blown in the street during an air raid.

The Belgian child is the casualty of an attack made from a German aircraft. The Taube was primarily a reconnaissance plane but carried bombs that could be thrown from the cockpit. The casual violence of the scene marks the increasing vulnerability of the civilian population. In his autobiography, Paint and Prejudice, Nevinson described the scene he witnessed: 'There the small boy lay before me, a symbol of all that was to come.'

The Taube (Taube translates as ‘Dove’, taub as ‘death’) was a German reconnaisance plane but carried bombs that could be thrown from the cockpit. The casual violence of the scene marks the increasing vulnerability of the civilian population. Both the title and the evidence of an explosion imply that this was the cause of death of the child. The assailants are deliberately excluded from the painting frame, the point being that they are out of sight and far removed both physically and emotionally from the scene, unable to control their attack or witness its ends. At first sight, the artist appears to simply demand an emotional response to the death of the Belgian child. Spread-eagled on the pavement, he is completely unprotected and his death incidental to the attack and to the war. However, the title raises other questions. As war demanded the efforts of entire nations and as the technology of the First World War developed, almost any target could be hit and its legitimacy justified. Judgement is not specifically against the individual pilots but against the means and methods of war. In his autobiography, 'Paint and Prejudice', Nevinson describes the scene: 'Dunkirk was one of the first towns to suffer aerial bombardment, and I was one of the first men to see a child who had been killed by it. There the small boy lay before me, a symbol of all that was to come.'


Over the Lines, 1917


oil on canvas
609 x 457 mm


Quote
An aerial view over a battle-scarred landscape, with a village, roads and the lines of trenches visible below. A British biplane is shown in flight with white puffs of anti-aircraft fire around it.


Swooping Down on a Hostile Plane, 1917


oil on canvas
609 x 457 mm


Quote
A view of aerial combat with a British Sopwith Camel attacking a German Taube, which is just visible towards the bottom of the composition.

The painting is mentioned in correspondence in September 1917 as being re-worked prior to its presentation to the Imperial War Museum: it may possibly have been the painting 'Taube Pursued by Commander Samson' shown in March 1915.


The Underworld: Taking cover in a Tube Station during a London air raid, 1918


oil on canvas
2540 x5486 mm


Quote
A scene of civilians, predominantly women and children, sheltering in Elephant and Castle tube station. Some civilians sit on the platform seating, whilst others sit or lie on the platform itself. On the wall behind are a few C R W Nevinson posters.


http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/search?filter%5BmakerString%5D%5B0%5D=%22Nevinson%2C%20C%20R%20W%20%28ARA%29%22&query=
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