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Author Topic: The ART of Flight  (Read 182475 times)

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purgatorio

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The ART of Flight
« on: August 25, 2012, 06:53:32 AM »

As we had topics recently about modern art ;) I'd like to start a thread on the depiction of aviation in art in the broadest sense.

Please feel free to contribute whatever you enjoy or deem interesting. That's what this topic is about! :)


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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2012, 07:42:25 AM »

Eric Ravilious (1903 – 1942)
was an English painter, designer, book illustrator and wood engraver. He served as a war artist, and died when the aircraft he was on was lost off Iceland.

Tiger Moth, 1942


Artwork details

This was painted in the summer of 1942 when the artist was attached to an R.A.F. station at Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire. Other pictures belonging to this period are 'View from the ‘Cockpit of a Moth’ Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester, ‘View over the Starboard Wing of a Moth’, Air Ministry, and ‘Elementary Flying Training’, Imperial War Museum.


Morning on the Tarmac, 1941



Two Walrus aircraft on the tarmac of a runway with some personnel in the background. Only the very front of the foremost plane is visible on the right, with the whole of other plane set further back towards the left. There is a reflection of the latter plane in a puddle on the tarmac in the foreground.

IWM Collections - Eric Ravilious
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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2012, 09:41:34 AM »

Ian Hamilton Finlay (1925 – 2006)
was a Scottish poet, writer, artist and gardener.

At the Field's Edge, 1978


Artwork details

This work consists of a folded sheet of paper (enclosing a separate sheet of tracing paper bearing the inscription and other information). On the right hand leaf of the open sheet is an image of the flat-topped prow of an aircraft carrier, from a drawing by John Borg Manduca; text on the opposite leaf reads: ‘At the field's edge, on the vertiginous cliff-top, stood a solitary hut’. The carrier is represented, as in other work by Finlay, as an aspect of the modern ‘epic’ and ‘sublime’.


Sailing Barge Red Wing, 1975


Artwork details

Made in collaboration with Ian Gardner, this work is one of Finlay's characteristic images of visual coincidence. The image of a sailing barge and its reflection printed in red make a bird shape on the green ground. The Wild Hawthorn Press is Finlay's own publishing press based at his home, Little Sparta, Stonypath, Lanark (reference this and the other prints described here). It is Finlay's habit to work with other artists and printers, using them to visualise his idea and his visual concept by drawing or typography and then having the result printed to his own specifications. In this case the image was drawn by Gardner.


Homage to Malevich, 1978


Artwork details

The abstract shapes in this print are derived from the paintings of the early twentieth-century Russian artist Kasimir Malevich, one of the pioneers of abstract painting. By adding a plume-like tail to one of the crosses, Finlay transforms it into the image of a fighter plane, shot down in flames. Finlay has said that Malevich would have seen himself as ‘the best aeroplane’, and that the victim in the dog-fight might be Vladimir Tatlin, a rival Soviet artist.
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Uufflakke

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2012, 09:49:59 AM »

Hans Liska.















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Uufflakke

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2012, 10:00:29 AM »

Leonardo da Vinci's helicopter.

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RedSpade

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2012, 10:33:59 AM »

 ;D  I like this very much.  Great idea.  Great images.
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Uufflakke

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2012, 10:55:35 AM »

Carel Willink

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Uufflakke

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2012, 10:59:25 AM »

Fiona Banner



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Uufflakke

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2012, 11:00:42 AM »

Anselm Kiefer

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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2012, 12:05:30 PM »

The Boneyard Projects, 2012

Pima Air and Space Museum,Tuscon Arizona theboneyardprojects.com








>> Videos <<
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purgatorio

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Re: The Art of Flight
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2012, 02:07:02 PM »

Charles Pears (1958)
was a British painter, illustrator and artist. A commissioned officer in the Royal Marines during the First World War, Pears worked also worked as an official War Artist during both the First and Second World Wars.

Handing Over a Convoy from American to British Escorts, 1941


http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/21430

A seascape depicting merchant and military shipping set against a cloudy blue sky with aircraft flying above. Two of the ships in the centre foreground are painted in dazzle camouflage schemes.


Bombardment of Pantellaria, Italy, 11 June 1943





This painting, signed ‘Chas Pears’ and produced for the War Artists Advisory Committee, shows an action of June 1943 during the Second World War. The small rocky Italian island of Pantellaria lies midway between Tunisia and Sicily, some 140 miles north-west of Malta. Since early in the war it had been of strategic interest to the Allies, but with the surrender of the German forces in Tunisia it became an obvious target for combined British-American attack in spring 1943. Not only would it aid the supply of allied forces in the Middle East and particularly the vital base of Malta, but it would also provide an important base for the proposed invasion of Italy. It was blockaded and bombarded by sea and air until it finally surrendered on 11 June.

It is the final, clearly irresistible assault that is the subject of Pears’ painting. In a panoramic vista taken from a distant vantage point at sea, it shows the island under siege by both sea and air, with the small town of Pantellaria at the left (north) end of the island encircled by eruptions of shell bursts and overhung with a heavy pall of thick smoke from blazing fires. Across the picture in the middle distance are ranged the force of covering cruisers: at the far left the stern of what might be the ‘Aurora’ with General Eisenhower aboard, then the ‘Penelope’, ‘Newfoundland’, ‘Orion’ and ‘Euryalus’. Above are 12 US Air Force Flying Fortresses returning from unloading their bombs onto the exposed town.

Pears’ focus on the dazzling June sunlight and hazy heat of the southern Mediterranean adds to the sense of unstoppable, glowing victory, while any involvement in the scale and human impact of the assault is deflected by the detached and distant viewpoint. The painting thus serves well its purpose for the War Artists Advisory Committee of both reporting the unfolding events of the war and raising morale for the British public. It was presented to the Museum by the War Artists Advisory Committee in 1946.


BBC Your Paintings - Charles Pears
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purgatorio

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HELICOPTERS
« Reply #11 on: August 25, 2012, 03:01:07 PM »

HELICOPTERS

Geoffrey Staden b.1953
Air-sea rescue from RAF Coltishall, Norfolk, 1981


acrylic on canvas, 1315 x 1260 mm

A view from the side of a helicopter of two crew members of the Air Sea Rescue Service. Both of the crew members have their backs to the viewer. One of the crew kneels on the deck of the helicopter guiding the winch and harness that holds the other crew member, who is either being lowered towards the water level or being brought back onboard the helicopter. Both wear yellow helmets and orange overalls and the sea is visible below them on the right.

iwm.org.uk - Geoffrey Staden


Jeffrey Milstein
Helicopters






kopeikingallery.com - Jeffrey Milstein
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